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October 21, 2009

Article on branches really hit home

Thank you for publishing Christopher Cadelago’s very excellent, well-researched article “Falling branches spell rising complaints” Oct. 10.

Numerous friends of mine in our community telephoned me and said it was indeed a real environmental eye opener.

TALBERT KANIGHER

Burbank

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Don’t feel at all sorry for Letterman

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Are we supposed to feel sorry for David Letterman? He had girlfriends working on his show whom he had sexual relations with after marrying his girlfriend and having a son.

His comments and/or jokes about famous people could be very berating, to the point of lacking in good taste. So he’s getting some of his own medicine. I don’t feel sorry for him. Maybe a lesson can be learned.

By the way, how do these affairs reflect on his lady friends? Did I say ladies?

WESLEY GREENE

Burbank

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City’s candidate tests try one’s patience

I had the dubious privilege of taking my second test recently for a position with the city. The first test I took was for a customer service representative position. The test was quite lengthy, difficult and fraught with unintentional spelling errors.

Because I know jobs with the city are very desirable, remuneration is above average and the benefits package is substantial, I want to believe these tests are well designed, well intentioned and not just used as mass disqualifiers.

Unfortunately, the test I took for a messenger/bill deliverer position leads me to a disturbing conclusion. The tests appear to be job specific, and I don’t think anyone actually performing these jobs has a hand in designing them. Moreover, I don’t think these tests are accurate appraisals of any candidate’s actual knowledge or experience.

After submitting to two sections of the test, it became obvious the test booklet was poorly designed and executed. The final sections of the test were rendered impossible to finish, or to pass, by the ineptness of page placement within the booklet. Instructions for one section of the test were placed on a previous page, forcing candidates to flip back and forth. As this was a timed test, a great deal of time was wasted on page flipping.

On the final section of the test, due to the placement of both the page and a staple, very important information was skewed to the left, at an angle, making it more of a test of neck-craning, or eye-crossing, than of knowledge or ability.

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