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The818now | By Meg James | February 7, 2014
Nickelodeon's new cartoon was hatched not through traditional television channels but in a Studio City efficiency apartment nicknamed the "Doodle Chamber. " The 41/2 -minute cartoon about two feisty, accident-prone ducks was intended to be a one-off, a little film crafted to entertain fellow animators at a short-film festival held at a New York bar. But in the hurly-burly world of children's television, network executives are desperate to find that next big hit. When animator Gary Di Raffaele, who goes by the name Gary Doodles, got an inquiry from a Nickelodeon executive about his duck cartoon, which he had posted on YouTube: "I thought it was spam," Di Raffaele said.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil and Jeff Tully megan.oneil@latimes.com, jeff.tully@latimes.com | March 9, 2012
A popular Burbank High School football player died at his home in Shadow Hills Tuesday night in what officials have ruled a suicide. The student was identified by Los Angeles County coroner's officials as 17-year-old Matthew Smyser. The official cause of death was released Thursday. Burbank Unified officials were notified of the death Wednesday morning by the Los Angeles Mayor's Crisis Response Team, Supt. Stan Carrizosa said. District grief counselors were immediately deployed to the school, where they remained all week.
NEWS
By Mark Kellam, mark.kellam@latimes.com | August 23, 2011
California is no longer reimbursing Burbank for its curbside recycling because the operator of the city's recycling center is accused of making more than $48 million in fraudulent claims. The city received nearly $20,500 in curbside recycling revenues from the state last fiscal year, according to a statement released Tuesday by the city. It will not receive any additional funds until a new operator is certified by the state and a new curbside application is approved. The California Department of Resources, Recycling and Recovery - known as CalRecycle - denied Burbank's application in January, but the city appealed.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | November 11, 2011
Burbank Unified officials have outlined plans to increase the minimum age for incoming kindergarten students while simultaneously launching a new program to serve those who don't make the modified cut-off date. The move will bring the district into compliance with new state legislation designed to eliminate younger children from the classroom who experts say sometimes can be unprepared. The Kindergarten Readiness Act, signed into law in 2010 by then-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, requires that all students entering kindergarten in 2014 must turn 5 by Sept.
NEWS
By Don Ray, Special to Times Community News | March 6, 2012
A 43-year-old Burbank man pleaded not guilty Tuesday to charges that he murdered the woman who was found dead in a parked car Friday at his parents' home. The man, David Perry, faces five felony counts, including murder, spousal abuse, making criminal threats and animal cruelty, officials said. He also pleaded not guilty to these charges. Perry was arrested Friday shortly after the body of Dorothy Jean McGuire, 37, of Sunland, was discovered in a parked car at his home in the 500 block of North Sparks Street in Burbank.
NEWS
By Ani Amirkhanian | May 20, 2006
Giuse Yen Viet Mai, owner of numerous furniture stores in Los Angeles county, including Urban Habitat Furniture in Burbank, died on May 15. He was 72. Mai was born on Oct. 10, 1933, in Vietnam. He was an officer in the Vietnamese army and a music conductor for the military band. After migrating with his family from Vietnam to the United States in 1975, Mai settled in Burbank and ventured into the furniture business. Mai started his furniture business in 1982 and opened his first store on Sunset Boulevard.
THE818NOW
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene@tchekmedyian@latimes.com | November 2, 2012
Burbank residents can pocket between $250 and $1,000 if they replace the grass on their front lawns with drought-tolerant and non-invasive plants as part of a Burbank Water and Power program approved this week that could save an estimated 750,000 gallons of water this fiscal year alone. “It's pretty exciting for us,” said Kapil Kulkarni, the utility's marketing associate. An eco-friendly front lawn, he added, could save single-family homes up to $15 on their monthly water bills.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonny Whiteside | June 16, 2012
When rock 'n' roll singer Jimmy Angel hits the stage at the Smoke House restaurant on Saturday, it will be just another stop along a decidedly tumultuous five-decade career path. Angel, who specializes in a mixture of retro-1950s big beat and fiery Memphis soul, has performed from the Tokyo Dome to Las Vegas showrooms to Manhattan's famed Copacabana - where he appeared no less than 39 times. Angel, now 77 but as clear-eyed and energetic as a man half that age, had a unique ace-in-the-hole throughout his early career: He was a close protege of Mafia don Joe Colombo, a Profaci family enforcer who rose from the ranks to become head of that crime organization in 1962.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lynne Heffley | November 9, 2012
In Irish playwright Jimmy Murphy's "The Muesli Belt," at Theatre Banshee in Burbank, a struggling pub owner and his neighbors face encroaching gentrification and the real estate feeding frenzy that was part of the stratospheric (and doomed) 1990s economic boom referred to in Ireland as the "Celtic Tiger. " Murphy's bittersweet drama, a U.S. premiere, opens in 1999 Dublin where the demolition ball of progress is banging on the door of a decrepit community in the guise of a developer intent on tearing down old properties for a new “muesli belt”: trendy bistros, health food stores and new apartments, to accommodate an expected influx of well-heeled yuppies.
NEWS
By Jonny Whiteside | January 20, 2014
If you dig Eric Clapton and Stevie Ray Vaughn, you're going to hate Little Victor, an untamed maverick whose raw, primitive sounds are the utter antithesis of the contemporary blues model. The offbeat singer-guitarist, who appears at Burbank's Joe's Great American and Viva Cantina this week, eschews the genre's prevalent trend for streamlined six-string virtuosity in favor of wild shouting, stabbing guitar and heavy, almost hypnotic, rhythmic repetition. It's very rough stuff, but is deeply rooted in blues tradition, and in Little Victor's case, was learned firsthand at the side of such hallowed blues masters as Louisiana Red and Hubert Sumlin.
THE818NOW
July 24, 2012
David A. Garcia, the man accused of killing Burbank Police Officer Matthew Pavelka in November 2003, pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and other charges Tuesday. Garcia, 28, was immediately sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. Pavelka, 26, was killed in an exchange of gunfi re during a routine stop outside the Ramada Inn after just 10 months on the force. His partner, Officer Gregory Campbell, was wounded as they approached a parked SUV -- in which Garcia was a passenger -- on suspicion that drug activity was taking place.
NEWS
By Bryan Mahoney | July 31, 2012
We're lucky to get one family in this life that's willing to push us when we're frustrated, when the odds are piled so highly against us that we just don't fight any more. Our families can be that wave that sends us tumbling onto the dry shore when we think we're drowning. Gustavo Osorio has not one such family, but two. The 22-year-old lives with his brother, sister and parents in a townhouse with its own little garden out front. The living room is sparsely decorated, but looming large over the couch is a painting of an angel Gustavo made when he was in high school.
THE818NOW
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene.tchekmedyian@latimes.com | January 11, 2013
Marisa Sanders remembers when television icon Huell Howser wandered into Burbank's Tallyrand restaurant two years ago. She gushed when he sat in front of her in a swivel chair at the diner's counter. “I said, 'I just want you to know - I know who you are,'” she recalled. “'My husband is your No. 1 fan.'” [For the Record, Jan. 14, 2013: A previous version of this story mispelled Marisa Sanders' first name. ] By the end of Howser's meal, the 20-year Tallyrand waitress had shared the whole history of the family-owned diner, including that both owners had met their respective spouses at the restaurant, and that it's famous for its hot turkey sandwich.
THE818NOW
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene.tchekmedyian@latimes.com | December 17, 2013
Alcohol, drugs and a high rate of speed appear to have been factors in a fiery car wreck in September that claimed the lives of five young people and left one severely injured , records show. The driver of the Nissan Altima involved in the single-car crash, Stephen Stoll, 23, had a blood alcohol level more than twice the legal limit, according to toxicology reports released Tuesday by the Los Angeles County Coroner's office . Stoll also reportedly had marijuana in his system.
NEWS
February 1, 2003
Jeff Tully Burroughs High has a fine reputation of churning out successful college football players. However, along with success on the field, the Indian program also has an impressive track record of preparing players for the future, as well as helping them make their way to prestigious universities. The latest in the line of successful student-athletes is senior Alan West. The 6-foot-2, 260-pound defensive lineman has committed to play at University of Pennsylvania, an Ivy-League powerhouse.
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