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Affordable Housing

NEWS
July 14, 2001
Lolita Harper CIVIC CENTER -- The Burbank City Council unanimously supported a plan Tuesday to spend $3.4 million to purchase and prepare 1.5 acres of land and sell it for $1 to a developer who will build affordable housing and a child-care center on the property. Despite an absence of concrete details, council members approved developer M. David Paul's plans, citing the city's dire need for more child care and affordable housing. The city would buy eight substandard apartment buildings and pay to relocate the tenants, then turn around and sell the land for $1. In return, Paul would build 20 three-story single-family homes -- half to be affordable housing -- and the shell of a child care center in the 200 blocks of North Ontario and North Fairview streets.
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NEWS
December 15, 2001
Laura Sturza BURBANK -- In an effort to address the housing crunch faced by Burbank's low- to very low-income families, the City Council voted Tuesday to fund the $791,500 purchase and rehabilitation of a seven-unit building. The apartments to be renovated are at 220 W. Tujunga Ave.. The city's project will not displace the current occupants, said Duane Solomon, the city's Redevelopment Agency Housing Development manager. The work is scheduled to begin March 11 and is expected to be complete by July 18. It is the latest project by the Burbank Housing Corporation, a nonprofit group that provides affordable housing.
NEWS
January 31, 2009
RECREATION CENTER RETROFIT The Federal Emergency Management Agency approved the City Council?s appeal for seismic retrofitting of the McCambridge Recreation Center in the amount of $671,000. The total cost of the retrofitting, scheduled to go to bid in May, will be $1,650,000. WHAT TO EXPECT The council will authorize City Manager Michael Flad to accept the funds from the California Office of Emergency Services, which will be given to the city once construction is complete.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | March 21, 2006
BURBANK ? In an effort to promote affordable housing in an expensive property market, city staffers have provided the City Council with two proposed ordinances to encourage developers to construct affordable housing. With the approval Tuesday of the two ordinances for a second reading, Burbank could see more affordable housing in as little as two years, said Joy Forbes, a Community Development Department planner. The first proposal, called the inclusionary housing ordinance, would apply only to developers building five or more units within one project.
NEWS
By Jesse L. Byers | January 3, 2009
The city’s affordable housing program is an admirable goal, but its execution is far from laudable (“Low-income housing OK’d,” Nov. 19). “Affordable housing” is meant as a euphemism for “low-cost housing,” but I beg to differ from the city’s apparent accepted definition of “low-cost.” A one-bedroom anything at $1,400 isn’t “affordable housing.” Most of those in the salary range targeted for the city’s affordable housing programs are what the government likes to call “the working poor” — those individuals among us who can actually perform physical labor, get up and go to a job. No one seems to be considering the elderly and disabled.
NEWS
February 7, 2001
Karen S. Kim BURBANK -- The first televised forum for the Feb. 27 primary election gave Burbank's City Council and city treasurer candidates ample opportunity to comment on specific and controversial questions about the city's future. Hosted by the League of Women Voters, Saturday's forum gave council candidates an opportunity to address a variety of issues, including the ROAR initiative, Burbank's electoral process, affordable housing in the city, development, partnership with other cities and energy conservation.
NEWS
By Leslie Simmons | November 24, 1999
CIVIC CENTER -- Applications for a vacancy on the Burbank Housing Corporation will be accepted until today. The housing corporation is a nonprofit organization providing assistance and property management services at affordable housing projects in the city. The vacancy is for a term ending Nov. 1, 2001. Applicants must live in Burbank and cannot be on another city board, commission or committee. The position is unpaid. Those interested can pick up an application at the city clerk's office in City Hall, 275 E. Olive Ave. The City Council is scheduled to announce its selection for the seat at its Dec. 7 meeting.
NEWS
By Jeremy Oberstein | November 19, 2008
CITY HALL — The City Council increased Burbank’s affordable housing stock Tuesday with a 4-1 vote that paves the way for a four- unit property on Naomi Street to be made available for low-income families. The council approved a $1.69-million loan, to be paid through a combination of federal and city grants that the Burbank Housing Corporation will now use to renovate and provide living assistance to its future tenants. “What we’re doing is preserving affordable housing stock,” said Judith Arandes, the group’s executive director.
NEWS
April 7, 2007
You can't blame a guy for trying to make a buck, and you certainly can't ask him to give it back once he makes it. But that is what the City Council is doing. It is asking investor David Augustine to reverse the sale of an affordable-housing complex to the city for $365,000 more than what he bought it for. Augustine was doing what any good businessman would do. Why else would he be in business? He bought the two-story, eight-unit complex on Verdugo Avenue for $1.03 million and sold it to the city for $1.4 million — approved by a City Council that now has buyer's remorse.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | February 25, 2006
BURBANK ? A fight to preserve 12 units of housing along Hollywood Way spilled into City Council chambers Tuesday night, as opponents rallied against a proposal that the council may be powerless to stop. The project would remove a two-story, 12-unit housing complex to make room for a 35-unit, three-story multifamily housing complex. Many residents object to the plan, saying trading a two-story for a three-story complex would alter the character of the neighborhood and increase population density.
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