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By Ani Amirkhanian | September 16, 2006
The Western Diocese of the Armenian Church will host its inaugural Festival of Faith and Culture on Saturday and Sunday at the Western Diocese headquarters in Burbank. "It's a good tradition to have for the Armenian church," said Shoghig Giragosian, festival committee chair. "Once a year, it's for people to get together, to get to know the various diocese and to know the services that are available to them." The festival will begin at 10 a.m. today with the opening ceremonies starting at 11 a.m. Thousands are expected to attend, Giragosian said.
NEWS
By Gretchen Meier | September 10, 2010
A new Cathedral of the Western Diocese on Glenoaks Boulevard will be consecrated on Saturday with all the local fanfare of local officialdome. The Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians Karekin II will be joined by Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and a number of other state and local officials for the dedication of a monument for the victims of the 9/11 attacks. Construction on the large, eye-catching church was recently completed on North Glenoaks Boulevard, rising up near the Golden State (5)
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | January 26, 2008
Several hundred people filled the Nazareth and Sima Kalaydjian Hall on Friday at the Western Diocese of the Armenian Church to commemorate the first anniversary of the assassination of journalist and editor Hrant Dink. Dink, 53, was fatally shot in Istanbul on Jan. 19, 2007, outside the bilingual Armenian and Turkish newspaper Agos, where he served as editor. Agos is considered one of the foremost voices for Turkey’s Armenian population. The program Friday opened with a slide presentation showing snapshots of Dink’s life, including several trips to the United States and a shot of him cradling the Henri Nannen Prize for the Freedom of the Press.
NEWS
January 8, 2005
Rima Shah This year's Armenian Christmas bore special poignancy, one of the most important leaders in the Armenian Church said Thursday in a holiday ceremony. This year marks the 90th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide. Archbishop Hovnan Derderian, primate of the Armenian Church of North Western Diocese, presided over the ceremony at the Western Diocese Headquarters in Burbank. The primate is the most important position in the Western Diocese and the second most important position in the world, said Matthew Ash, youth director of the Western Diocese.
NEWS
March 2, 2005
Jackson Bell Two local charities received a sizable chunk of a $20-million insurance settlement Monday for heirs of those slain in the Armenian genocide. Representatives from Glendale-based Armenian Educational Foundation and Burbank-based Armenian Church of the North America Western Diocese received checks for more than $333,000 each during a ceremony in Pasadena on Monday. New York Life last year agreed to settle the 1999 class-action lawsuit filed by descendants of victims of the 1915 genocide.
NEWS
By Rachel Kane | September 20, 2006
Armenian art, music, food, faith and culture was explored by people from Burbank, Glendale, Pasadena and beyond on Sunday. In the parking lot of the Western Diocese of the Armenian Church of North America, the first "Festival of Faith and Culture" took place from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Live performances featured Armenian singers, musicians and a few comedians. The event also brought out bounce houses for children and art displays for aficionados. The festivities were all about the Armenian culture and Christian faith, said Shoghig Giragosian, chairwoman of the festival committee.
NEWS
March 12, 2005
Jackson Bell Heirs of those killed in the Armenian genocide have until Wednesday to file claims to receive their share of a $20-million insurance settlement. New York Life last year agreed to settle the 1999 class-action lawsuit filed by descendants of victims of the 1915 genocide. They accused the insurance company of not paying out 2,300 policies purchased by their slain relatives in the Ottoman Empire, officials said. People can find out if they are eligible by calling the Armenian Insurance Settlement Fund or visiting its website and checking the list of victims' names.
NEWS
March 5, 2005
Money can't bring back lives lost. It can't bring back grandmothers, grandfathers, parents, children or ancestors never known. But it can be a step on the long road to healing, justice and a better community. Representatives from the Glendale-based Armenian Educational Foundation and Burbank-based Armenian Church of the North America Western Diocese received checks this week for more than $333,000. It was part of a settlement reached last year in which insurance company New York Life agreed to settle with descendants of victims of the 1915 Armenian Genocide.
FEATURES
By Zain Shauk and The Leader | January 5, 2009
Armenian Christmas started early for Glendale Memorial Hospital patients, who received a visit and a celebratory snack from employees Monday morning. Round loaves of gata bread, a sweet bread that many Armenians eat on Christmas, were a part of the room-to-room surprises offered by Chaplain Larry Johnson and other participants Monday who hoped to brighten up the holiday experience for patients. “As you walk in, people’s faces light up,” Johnson said of the difference the holiday visits made for patients.
NEWS
By David Laurell | January 21, 2014
While many Burbankers spend the first week of the new year taking down and packing away their Christmas decorations, those of the local Armenian community are just gearing up for the big day. Although most Christians celebrate Christmas in late December, Armenians do so in early January. The reason for this stems back to the end of the third century when Roman Christians decided to recognize the birth of Christ on Dec. 25, to coincide with a pagan holiday. This decision was not accepted by the Armenian Church, and Armenian Christians have always continued to maintain the ancient tradition of celebrating the birth and baptism of Christ on Jan. 6. Members of the Burbank chapter of the Armenian National Committee were recently joined by representatives of local and state government, law enforcement, safety services and the business community to celebrate their traditional January observance of Christmas at their annual holiday reception and dinner.
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NEWS
By David Laurell | January 21, 2014
While many Burbankers spend the first week of the new year taking down and packing away their Christmas decorations, those of the local Armenian community are just gearing up for the big day. Although most Christians celebrate Christmas in late December, Armenians do so in early January. The reason for this stems back to the end of the third century when Roman Christians decided to recognize the birth of Christ on Dec. 25, to coincide with a pagan holiday. This decision was not accepted by the Armenian Church, and Armenian Christians have always continued to maintain the ancient tradition of celebrating the birth and baptism of Christ on Jan. 6. Members of the Burbank chapter of the Armenian National Committee were recently joined by representatives of local and state government, law enforcement, safety services and the business community to celebrate their traditional January observance of Christmas at their annual holiday reception and dinner.
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NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | December 11, 2010
In early September, state transportation officials placed signs on Interstate 5 identifying exits for the St. Leon Cathedral of the Armenian Apostolic Church in Burbank — but without the typical legislative go-ahead. Identifying significant institutions is nothing new for the California Department of Transportation, but the roadside signs require legislation. Now, three months after the church signs were installed, Assemblyman Mike Gatto (D-Silver Lake) has introduced the necessary resolution.
NEWS
By Gretchen Meier | September 10, 2010
A new Cathedral of the Western Diocese on Glenoaks Boulevard will be consecrated on Saturday with all the local fanfare of local officialdome. The Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians Karekin II will be joined by Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and a number of other state and local officials for the dedication of a monument for the victims of the 9/11 attacks. Construction on the large, eye-catching church was recently completed on North Glenoaks Boulevard, rising up near the Golden State (5)
FEATURES
By Zain Shauk and The Leader | January 5, 2009
Armenian Christmas started early for Glendale Memorial Hospital patients, who received a visit and a celebratory snack from employees Monday morning. Round loaves of gata bread, a sweet bread that many Armenians eat on Christmas, were a part of the room-to-room surprises offered by Chaplain Larry Johnson and other participants Monday who hoped to brighten up the holiday experience for patients. “As you walk in, people’s faces light up,” Johnson said of the difference the holiday visits made for patients.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | January 26, 2008
Several hundred people filled the Nazareth and Sima Kalaydjian Hall on Friday at the Western Diocese of the Armenian Church to commemorate the first anniversary of the assassination of journalist and editor Hrant Dink. Dink, 53, was fatally shot in Istanbul on Jan. 19, 2007, outside the bilingual Armenian and Turkish newspaper Agos, where he served as editor. Agos is considered one of the foremost voices for Turkey’s Armenian population. The program Friday opened with a slide presentation showing snapshots of Dink’s life, including several trips to the United States and a shot of him cradling the Henri Nannen Prize for the Freedom of the Press.
NEWS
By Rachel Kane | September 20, 2006
Armenian art, music, food, faith and culture was explored by people from Burbank, Glendale, Pasadena and beyond on Sunday. In the parking lot of the Western Diocese of the Armenian Church of North America, the first "Festival of Faith and Culture" took place from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Live performances featured Armenian singers, musicians and a few comedians. The event also brought out bounce houses for children and art displays for aficionados. The festivities were all about the Armenian culture and Christian faith, said Shoghig Giragosian, chairwoman of the festival committee.
NEWS
By Ani Amirkhanian | September 16, 2006
The Western Diocese of the Armenian Church will host its inaugural Festival of Faith and Culture on Saturday and Sunday at the Western Diocese headquarters in Burbank. "It's a good tradition to have for the Armenian church," said Shoghig Giragosian, festival committee chair. "Once a year, it's for people to get together, to get to know the various diocese and to know the services that are available to them." The festival will begin at 10 a.m. today with the opening ceremonies starting at 11 a.m. Thousands are expected to attend, Giragosian said.
NEWS
March 12, 2005
Jackson Bell Heirs of those killed in the Armenian genocide have until Wednesday to file claims to receive their share of a $20-million insurance settlement. New York Life last year agreed to settle the 1999 class-action lawsuit filed by descendants of victims of the 1915 genocide. They accused the insurance company of not paying out 2,300 policies purchased by their slain relatives in the Ottoman Empire, officials said. People can find out if they are eligible by calling the Armenian Insurance Settlement Fund or visiting its website and checking the list of victims' names.
NEWS
March 5, 2005
Money can't bring back lives lost. It can't bring back grandmothers, grandfathers, parents, children or ancestors never known. But it can be a step on the long road to healing, justice and a better community. Representatives from the Glendale-based Armenian Educational Foundation and Burbank-based Armenian Church of the North America Western Diocese received checks this week for more than $333,000. It was part of a settlement reached last year in which insurance company New York Life agreed to settle with descendants of victims of the 1915 Armenian Genocide.
NEWS
March 2, 2005
Jackson Bell Two local charities received a sizable chunk of a $20-million insurance settlement Monday for heirs of those slain in the Armenian genocide. Representatives from Glendale-based Armenian Educational Foundation and Burbank-based Armenian Church of the North America Western Diocese received checks for more than $333,000 each during a ceremony in Pasadena on Monday. New York Life last year agreed to settle the 1999 class-action lawsuit filed by descendants of victims of the 1915 genocide.
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