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NEWS
February 17, 2001
Lolita Harper HILLSIDE DISTRICT -- He crouched in the bushes of Fort Tejon State Historical Park, waiting for the perfect opportunity to strike. Looking over the barrel of his gun, he spotted his target. Anxious to attack, he leapt from behind the brush and charged. It was as good a time as any to kill his father. But Brett Schweinfurth, 21, is not a murderer. He is a Civil War reenactor. "I'm a Union soldier, and my father's a Confederate," he said.
NEWS
March 5, 2003
Michael T. Giovanniello of Burbank is a freelance writer. I found this highly anticipated film, although well executed, directed and acted, to be tedious and repetitive. It failed to develop a sense of reality for me. Then again, perhaps that is what war does to people. The nearly four-hour presentation, divided by a brief intermission and replete with agonizing battle scenes, seemed ponderous. This storytelling, with its multiple captioning of events and strategic Civil War highlights, seemed more suited to a documentary.
NEWS
March 16, 2005
I almost guarantee if you see "Mine Eyes Hath Seen," you will have one of the best theater experiences currently available in Southern California. Theatre Banshee and its cofounder Sean Branney of Glendale present a play of compelling emotion and human tragedy. The production consists of a compilation of letters, addresses, newspaper articles and memoirs linked by a cool, unbiased commentary of the Civil War in the words of those who lived and died in its unfolding.
NEWS
By ADAM SCHIFF | December 6, 2006
In one of the more stunning midterm elections in the last two decades, American voters called for a change of direction, especially with respect to the Bush administration's handling of the war in Iraq. As Americans have watched the escalating sectarian violence there — the car bombings, mass kidnappings and gangland-style executions — and agonized over the terrible loss of life, they have grown increasingly concerned with the policy of "stay the course." Notwithstanding the incredible courage and dedication of our troops, the violence in Iraq has grown worse not better, and this has caused not only the public, but many senior military officers (current and retired)
NEWS
May 29, 2004
In 1865, Henry C. Welles, a druggist in the village of Waterloo, N.Y., mentioned at a social gathering that honor should be shown to the patriotic dead of the Civil War by decorating their graves. In the spring of 1866, he again mentioned this subject to Gen. John B. Murray, Seneca County clerk. Gen. Murray embraced the idea, and a committee was formed to plan a day devoted to honoring the dead. Townspeople adopted the idea wholeheartedly. Wreaths, crosses and bouquets were made for each veteran's grave.
NEWS
February 5, 2005
Rosette Gonzales As a veteran of special effects and the film industry, Thomas G. Smith knows how to captivate an audience. He has worked on such classics as "ET: The Extra Terrestrial," "Raiders of the Lost Ark" and "Return of the Jedi," although his latest project isn't visually enhanced, Smith paints a picture with words. His novel "Massacre at Baxter Springs" tells the story of Smith's great-grandfather, William H. Clark and the Civil War events leading up to the tragic ambush at Baxter Springs, Kansas in 1863.
NEWS
June 23, 2001
Molly Shore HILLSIDE -- "God shapes the world by prayer. The more praying there is in the world, The better the world will be." The words were written by Confederate Army chaplain Edwin McKendree Bounds (1835-1913) after his hometown of Franklin, Tenn., was decimated on Nov. 30, 1864, in one of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War. Now, more than a century later, the chaplain's words will be remembered at a community-wide Concert of Prayer set for 6 p.m. Sunday at Emmanuel Evangelical Free Church of Burbank.
NEWS
March 5, 2005
TODAY Theatre Banshee presents the world premiere of its U.S. Civil War stage documentary "Mine Eyes Hath Seen," opening today at the Gene Bua Theatre, 3435 W. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank. The epic is brought to life through period music and the first-person writings of the men and women who lived through it. Performances are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through April 10. Tickets are $18, $12 for students, seniors and groups. (818) 628-0688.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Dupuy | February 13, 2008
What with Clinton, Obama and McCain talking our ears off all over the airwaves and two former presidents’ birthdays happening this month, ’tis the season for presidential stuff. So take a break from the knee-jerk political posturing on TV and take in the thoughtful and charming recollections of arguably the most amusing president of the United States in the new show at the Falcon Theatre, “The Memoirs of Abraham Lincoln.” Granville Van Dusen is a master at playing Lincoln in this one-man show.
NEWS
November 29, 2003
DAUGHTERS DONATE BOOKS TO LIBRARY At a recent meeting at the Southern California Genea- logical Society, members of the Capt. Sally Tompkins Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy made a donation of 125 books relating to the Civil War and Southern history to the society's research library. The books will now be part of the library's permanent collec- tion. Society President Pat Parish attended the meeting to receive the donation. The daughters group is a service organization with membership open to women who have ancestors who served with the Confederate States of America during the Civil War or who have an interest in Southern history.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Dupuy | February 13, 2008
What with Clinton, Obama and McCain talking our ears off all over the airwaves and two former presidents’ birthdays happening this month, ’tis the season for presidential stuff. So take a break from the knee-jerk political posturing on TV and take in the thoughtful and charming recollections of arguably the most amusing president of the United States in the new show at the Falcon Theatre, “The Memoirs of Abraham Lincoln.” Granville Van Dusen is a master at playing Lincoln in this one-man show.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | January 20, 2007
An exclusive Los Angeles exhibition of 19th century American artist Winslow Homer's wood etchings opening next week at the Forest Lawn Museum in Glendale will offer a peek at early American life. Homer depicted historical events in his pieces, like the American Civil War, many of which appeared in magazines like Ballou's Pictorial and Harper's Weekly. This exhibition covers his early works from 1857 to 1866 as well as the years following the American Civil War from 1867 to 1874.
NEWS
By ADAM SCHIFF | December 6, 2006
In one of the more stunning midterm elections in the last two decades, American voters called for a change of direction, especially with respect to the Bush administration's handling of the war in Iraq. As Americans have watched the escalating sectarian violence there — the car bombings, mass kidnappings and gangland-style executions — and agonized over the terrible loss of life, they have grown increasingly concerned with the policy of "stay the course." Notwithstanding the incredible courage and dedication of our troops, the violence in Iraq has grown worse not better, and this has caused not only the public, but many senior military officers (current and retired)
NEWS
By Tania Chatila | October 25, 2006
BURBANK — The war in Iraq and foreign policy are among the top issues for candidates running against incumbent Adam Schiff for the 29th Congressional District seat on Nov. 7. "I want to end the war and bring the troops home," said Bill Paparian, a former mayor of Pasadena and a member of the Green Party. He is running against Schiff, a Democrat; Linda Llamas, of the Peace and Freedom Party; Libertarian Jim Keller; and Republican William Bodell. The 29th Congressional District includes Glendale, Burbank and Pasadena.
NEWS
March 16, 2005
I almost guarantee if you see "Mine Eyes Hath Seen," you will have one of the best theater experiences currently available in Southern California. Theatre Banshee and its cofounder Sean Branney of Glendale present a play of compelling emotion and human tragedy. The production consists of a compilation of letters, addresses, newspaper articles and memoirs linked by a cool, unbiased commentary of the Civil War in the words of those who lived and died in its unfolding.
NEWS
March 5, 2005
TODAY Theatre Banshee presents the world premiere of its U.S. Civil War stage documentary "Mine Eyes Hath Seen," opening today at the Gene Bua Theatre, 3435 W. Magnolia Blvd., Burbank. The epic is brought to life through period music and the first-person writings of the men and women who lived through it. Performances are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays through April 10. Tickets are $18, $12 for students, seniors and groups. (818) 628-0688.
NEWS
February 5, 2005
Rosette Gonzales As a veteran of special effects and the film industry, Thomas G. Smith knows how to captivate an audience. He has worked on such classics as "ET: The Extra Terrestrial," "Raiders of the Lost Ark" and "Return of the Jedi," although his latest project isn't visually enhanced, Smith paints a picture with words. His novel "Massacre at Baxter Springs" tells the story of Smith's great-grandfather, William H. Clark and the Civil War events leading up to the tragic ambush at Baxter Springs, Kansas in 1863.
NEWS
May 29, 2004
In 1865, Henry C. Welles, a druggist in the village of Waterloo, N.Y., mentioned at a social gathering that honor should be shown to the patriotic dead of the Civil War by decorating their graves. In the spring of 1866, he again mentioned this subject to Gen. John B. Murray, Seneca County clerk. Gen. Murray embraced the idea, and a committee was formed to plan a day devoted to honoring the dead. Townspeople adopted the idea wholeheartedly. Wreaths, crosses and bouquets were made for each veteran's grave.
NEWS
March 27, 2004
JOYCE RUDOLPH Along with an uplifting of the spirit, listeners are promised a program rich in the history of black vocal music when the Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles casts its "Spotlight on Los Angeles" in a concert this weekend at the Alex Theatre. Artistic director Bruce Mayhall conducts the 300 voices in this concert that honors the city of the chorus' birth and the diverse ethnic makeup of it. One of the guest performance groups is the Albert McNeil Jubilee Singers, which took its first European tour 36 years ago. Since then, they have performed 18 sold-out European tours, as well as completing 12 tours of the United States and Canada, and tours of the Middle and Far East, Africa and South America.
NEWS
November 29, 2003
DAUGHTERS DONATE BOOKS TO LIBRARY At a recent meeting at the Southern California Genea- logical Society, members of the Capt. Sally Tompkins Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy made a donation of 125 books relating to the Civil War and Southern history to the society's research library. The books will now be part of the library's permanent collec- tion. Society President Pat Parish attended the meeting to receive the donation. The daughters group is a service organization with membership open to women who have ancestors who served with the Confederate States of America during the Civil War or who have an interest in Southern history.
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