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NEWS
February 9, 2002
Gary Moskowitz BURBANK -- Students in Jerry Mullady's United States Government class at John Burroughs High School have a new understanding of citizenship. The group of 24 Burroughs High juniors and seniors attended a "We the People ... The Citizen and the Constitution" regional competition in December. The group won second place at the competition and was the first Burbank class to participate in the citizenship program since it started 15 years ago. The Burroughs students participated in a simulated congressional hearing and had to demonstrate knowledge of the Bill of Rights, Constitution and rights of citizens.
NEWS
March 17, 2001
Letters attacking me personally for my Jan. 3 community commentary have been too hysterical for rational response. But I will try to correct factual errors, such as Lowell Gronich's Jan. 24 "Shame on you, Mr. Bill Starr for your commentary." He stated: "'We the people,' who have assigned the job of interpreting the Constitution to the courts, are a nation of laws."' No, neither "We the people" nor our elected representatives have ever made that assignment in the Constitution or anywhere else.
NEWS
By Lauren Hilgers | June 3, 2006
When 11-year-old Preny Baghadasarain found out about the electoral college this semester, she was shocked. "If more people found out about the electoral college, I think they would be discouraged from voting," she said. "I was surprised." If Preny had her way, the electoral college system would be abolished. Preny's opinion is exactly the kind of critical thinking Joaquin Miller Elementary teacher Kim Allender hoped to foster in his fourth annual We the People Showcase Congressional Hearing on Wednesday.
NEWS
January 17, 2001
Regarding the comments of front-page columnist Will Rogers ("Funding of columnist good for city") in the Dec. 27 issue of the Leader, for many years he has ridiculed a Glendale appointee to the Airport Authority for making outlandish statements in the expectation that all should believe them simply because he, himself, had uttered them. The columnist has now fallen into the same rut of expecting all to believe regardless of how factually inaccurate his proclamations might be. One example from his column: "The ROAR initiative is deeply flawed and makes demands that violate the U.S. Constitution."
NEWS
May 31, 2003
Molly Shore Sophia Vamvakas believes she is very fortunate to live in one of the only countries in the world that protects its citizens' natural rights. Sophia, 11, and her classmates in Lisa Yim's fifth-grade class at Edison Elementary School now know about the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. For the past three months they have immersed themselves in the study of the U.S. Constitution. "We've learned how we can protect our rights, because if we don't, they can be taken away from us," Sophia said.
NEWS
November 25, 2000
Superior Court Judge Alexander Williams' biased decision to subvert the constitutional liberty of Christians was no surprise. The Burbank City Council should appeal. Everyone knows how fake this all is. The liars and the losers that populate our judicial circuses love to dish out law but cannot bring themselves to dispense justice. The "separation of church and state" mantra that fuels these fires cannot be found in the 1st Amendment. All Americans are guaranteed free religious expression, and Congress may not establish a national religion.
NEWS
June 7, 2000
Take a good look at Second Amendment The National Rifle Association in its virulent opposition to the recent Million Mom March in Washington, D.C. (as well as in LA and other major U.S. cities) belabors the point that the Second Amendment to this country's constitution is inviolate and precludes any such involvement by Congress. Is this actually the case? Is the wording absolute? The First Amendment to our Constitution says that Congress shall make no law prohibiting freedom of speech.
NEWS
January 24, 2001
It has been years since I have read a piece of purple-prosed hate mongering to compare with Mr. Starr's commentary ("Fight prayer ban or face slippery slope") in the Jan. 3 issue of the Burbank Leader. He devotes many paragraphs describing what he thinks of Irv Rubin, as if that has anything to do with the issue, which it does not. The issue is the meaning of the first 16 words of the 1st Amendment to the Constitution. This deserves serious, objective, dispassionate debate.
NEWS
August 21, 2010
Richard Tafilaw is too late. Burbank is already a transportation hub ("Don't aspire to be a transportation hub," Aug. 18). We have two rail lines, two freeways and an airport, and they are not going away. The challenge for the Burbank City Council and the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority, as well as state and regional agencies, is to find ways to mitigate the impacts of these essential facilities. The proposed transportation center at the airport does that by making it easier for passengers to use public transportation by bringing together rail, bus and airline services and making the transfer between them more convenient.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 21, 2010
Richard Tafilaw is too late. Burbank is already a transportation hub ("Don't aspire to be a transportation hub," Aug. 18). We have two rail lines, two freeways and an airport, and they are not going away. The challenge for the Burbank City Council and the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority, as well as state and regional agencies, is to find ways to mitigate the impacts of these essential facilities. The proposed transportation center at the airport does that by making it easier for passengers to use public transportation by bringing together rail, bus and airline services and making the transfer between them more convenient.
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NEWS
By William B. Waddell | August 26, 2006
The most logical statement in Steven Peterson's anti-Bush rant ("Constitutional rights are there for every one of us," Community Commentary, Aug. 12) is the one he seeks to disparage in commenting on Mel Wolfe's letter to the Leader of Aug. 5 ("Aggressive policy is not unconstitutional," Mailbag). With some rephrasing of my own, Wolfe's reading of the Constitution of the United States of America failed to find that foreign combatants, unaligned with any state, are entitled to constitutional rights and remedies when they wish to kill our citizens.
NEWS
By Steven B. Peterson | August 12, 2006
In his recent letter to this space ("Aggressive policy is not unconstitutional," Aug. 5), Mel Wolf wrote of President George W. Bush's record, "My reading of the Constitution and of news reports on debatable policy of this administration comes up with nothing that I find as a violation of any rights I, or of anyone I know, have." I suspect one has to actively avoid any credible, reliable, documented report on the actions of this administration to remain unaware of many examples of the current administration's penchant for dismissing or disowning a wide variety of Constitutional rights.
NEWS
By Lauren Hilgers | June 3, 2006
When 11-year-old Preny Baghadasarain found out about the electoral college this semester, she was shocked. "If more people found out about the electoral college, I think they would be discouraged from voting," she said. "I was surprised." If Preny had her way, the electoral college system would be abolished. Preny's opinion is exactly the kind of critical thinking Joaquin Miller Elementary teacher Kim Allender hoped to foster in his fourth annual We the People Showcase Congressional Hearing on Wednesday.
NEWS
May 31, 2003
Molly Shore Sophia Vamvakas believes she is very fortunate to live in one of the only countries in the world that protects its citizens' natural rights. Sophia, 11, and her classmates in Lisa Yim's fifth-grade class at Edison Elementary School now know about the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. For the past three months they have immersed themselves in the study of the U.S. Constitution. "We've learned how we can protect our rights, because if we don't, they can be taken away from us," Sophia said.
NEWS
April 6, 2002
Laura Sturza LOS ANGELES -- The battle over Measure A rages on, even though the issue is not due back in court until later this month. Court papers filed earlier this week reassert the claim that the measure is constitutional. The documents were filed by community intervenor Mike Nolan, stemming from the lawsuit between the city and the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority. "It is constitutional because it doesn't usurp any powers that are given exclusively to the city of Burbank," Nolan attorney Dennis Winston said.
NEWS
February 9, 2002
Gary Moskowitz BURBANK -- Students in Jerry Mullady's United States Government class at John Burroughs High School have a new understanding of citizenship. The group of 24 Burroughs High juniors and seniors attended a "We the People ... The Citizen and the Constitution" regional competition in December. The group won second place at the competition and was the first Burbank class to participate in the citizenship program since it started 15 years ago. The Burroughs students participated in a simulated congressional hearing and had to demonstrate knowledge of the Bill of Rights, Constitution and rights of citizens.
NEWS
October 17, 2001
Ryan Carter HILLSIDE DISTRICT -- State and local officials will meet to talk about the United States Constitution on Thursday. A Constitution observance will be at 6:30 p.m. at the Masonic Center, 406 Irving Drive. Burbank Police Chief Thomas Hoefel, Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich, state Sen. Jack Scott (D-Burbank) and Assemblyman Dario Frommer (D-Burbank) have been invited to discuss the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, the Constitution's first 10 amendments.
NEWS
March 17, 2001
Letters attacking me personally for my Jan. 3 community commentary have been too hysterical for rational response. But I will try to correct factual errors, such as Lowell Gronich's Jan. 24 "Shame on you, Mr. Bill Starr for your commentary." He stated: "'We the people,' who have assigned the job of interpreting the Constitution to the courts, are a nation of laws."' No, neither "We the people" nor our elected representatives have ever made that assignment in the Constitution or anywhere else.
NEWS
January 24, 2001
It has been years since I have read a piece of purple-prosed hate mongering to compare with Mr. Starr's commentary ("Fight prayer ban or face slippery slope") in the Jan. 3 issue of the Burbank Leader. He devotes many paragraphs describing what he thinks of Irv Rubin, as if that has anything to do with the issue, which it does not. The issue is the meaning of the first 16 words of the 1st Amendment to the Constitution. This deserves serious, objective, dispassionate debate.
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