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NEWS
March 8, 2013
At previous points in columnist Ron Kaye's long and storied career, he would have embraced a maverick like Mike Gatto. What the heck happened? Now, instead of covering the issues, Kaye finds himself wallowing in the mud of petty local politics, seemingly led around with a ring in his nose by political hit men with grossly exaggerated claims and agendas. It has been months since Kaye provided any substantive coverage, making readers like me wonder what Kaye's agenda is, and who is fact checking and editing his pieces.
NEWS
July 16, 2003
JEFF TULLY Nothing gets a young player's attention quite like a mouthful of dirt. I should know, having dined on a sod sandwich as a young Little League baseball player. The incident brings to mind some of the of the wacky and unbelievable things I have seen coaches do over the years. The most memorable happening took place when I was 11 years old and playing for Aviation Little League in Hawthorne. Competing for the Major Division Braves, our team had to endure the old-school techniques and discipline of Jim Schofield, a drill instructor impersonating a coach.
NEWS
By By Lauren Hilgers | November 19, 2005
Planting of trees gives relief from the heat and provides opportunity for educational lessons.For more than 40 years the expanse of black asphalt behind Roosevelt Elementary has sat largely without shade; students playing basketball, hopscotch and dodge ball did so under the rays of the omnipresent Southern California sun. That finally changed Thursday morning. Students, teachers and volunteers from Warner Bros. shoveled, planted and watered their way to a little relief from the sun, adding 12 young trees to the dark tarmac.
NEWS
December 1, 2004
Jacqui Brown After spending about $5 million for a gymnasium and pool, dust and dirt are creating a problem for both facilities at Burbank High School. Principal Bruce Osgood said they won't know the cost of the damage for a while because of the dirt and dust that has been blown into the new gymnasium, scratching the floor and covering the pool with debris. "We have a phenomenal facility inside and out, but now that we have this dust problem we need to bring it to light before we incur further damage," Osgood said.
NEWS
January 1, 2011
While the prospect of having the big bad government swoop in and throw down a sidewalk on your lawn may sound extremely distasteful, consider this: There's already a sidewalk; it just happens to be a dirt path instead of concrete. That the City Council voted narrowly to put Burbank at risk of losing at least $125,000 in federal grant funding just to appease the fears of a handful of Screenland Drive residents borders on negligent. Burbank has received more than $3 million in federal assistance as part of a program to improve pedestrian walkways and routes throughout the city — and deciding to roll over to the residents on Screenland Drive will almost surely ding future applications for funding.
NEWS
March 31, 2004
Jeff Tully Athletes had more to worry about than their fellow competitors Tuesday in the second Foothill League boys' golf match of the season at De Bell Municipal Golf Course. As the golfers were teeing off, course maintenance crews were busy in tractors aerating the fairways, leaving countless small dirt cylinders littering the venue. At one point, a Valencia player teed off on the first hole and his shot hit the back tire of one of the tractors, which caused the ball to ricochet off the fairway.
NEWS
July 18, 2001
Gary Moskowitz MAGNOLIA PARK -- In 1933, Peter Arceneaux would shine a man's wingtip shoes for 5 cents, enough money to buy a gallon of milk or a bottle of wine. Now, after 68 years of shining shoes -- 20 years at Burbank's Magnolia Island Car Wash -- Arceneaux's shoe shines have gone up to a grand total of $2.50. But he's in the business for the perks, not the money. "I work for myself. There's no time I have to be here every day, and some days, I just don't come at all," laughed a bearded, cap-wearing, Louisiana-accented Arceneaux, who celebrated his 78th birthday with friends and clients Tuesday.
NEWS
January 9, 2002
Laura Sturza HILLSIDE DISTRICT -- John Dincher is up in arms. His business, West Coast Auto Resale, is on a lot adjacent to a vacant, city-owned parcel that he said is at times a "dust bowl" and at others, steeped in mud. "This year it was much worse," Dincher said in December. "I had to call several times and plead with the city to cut the weeds down." He went on to say that when the city cut the weeds, it immediately rented the area to a studio.
NEWS
By Patrick Caneday | August 29, 2009
I was feeling rather morose the other day. Kind of pathetic, lowly, defeated and self loathing. There was a dull pain in my chest that I attribute to being unsatisfied with my job, having not left a significant mark upon this world by the age of 42, having neither made the best seller list — which would actually require writing a book — nor being a millionaire and owning a vacation home in either Cambria or Palm Springs. Or it could be the high cholesterol. I needed to get myself out of this funk.
NEWS
August 7, 2004
ANNE LOUISE Maybe it's me ... but why is it so hard for kids to clean something? It has never seemed like a difficult concept to me: You see dirt, you remove dirt, you have clean. Fairly basic. The same concept applies to clutter: You see clutter, you put away clutter, you have neat. And yet, teaching these simple concepts to the children has been an almost impossible task. With seven people in the house doing the cluttering, and only one person in the house putting away the clutter -- and guess who that is -- the situation was getting out of hand.
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NEWS
March 8, 2013
At previous points in columnist Ron Kaye's long and storied career, he would have embraced a maverick like Mike Gatto. What the heck happened? Now, instead of covering the issues, Kaye finds himself wallowing in the mud of petty local politics, seemingly led around with a ring in his nose by political hit men with grossly exaggerated claims and agendas. It has been months since Kaye provided any substantive coverage, making readers like me wonder what Kaye's agenda is, and who is fact checking and editing his pieces.
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NEWS
January 1, 2011
While the prospect of having the big bad government swoop in and throw down a sidewalk on your lawn may sound extremely distasteful, consider this: There's already a sidewalk; it just happens to be a dirt path instead of concrete. That the City Council voted narrowly to put Burbank at risk of losing at least $125,000 in federal grant funding just to appease the fears of a handful of Screenland Drive residents borders on negligent. Burbank has received more than $3 million in federal assistance as part of a program to improve pedestrian walkways and routes throughout the city — and deciding to roll over to the residents on Screenland Drive will almost surely ding future applications for funding.
NEWS
By Patrick Caneday | August 29, 2009
I was feeling rather morose the other day. Kind of pathetic, lowly, defeated and self loathing. There was a dull pain in my chest that I attribute to being unsatisfied with my job, having not left a significant mark upon this world by the age of 42, having neither made the best seller list — which would actually require writing a book — nor being a millionaire and owning a vacation home in either Cambria or Palm Springs. Or it could be the high cholesterol. I needed to get myself out of this funk.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | January 31, 2007
CIVIC CENTER — With a free-standing canopy shielding a ceremonial dirt pile from the looming clouds, Burbank City Council members dug in their shovels to spirited applause Tuesday during a ground breaking for a new Community Services Building. And the rain largely spared the celebration for a project 13 years in the making. "Finally," Public Works Director Bonnie Teaford said, "this is the day we've been waiting for." The 72,000-square-foot facility will replace the Municipal Services Building, which was destroyed because of massive structural damage from the 1994 Northridge earthquake.
NEWS
By By Lauren Hilgers | November 19, 2005
Planting of trees gives relief from the heat and provides opportunity for educational lessons.For more than 40 years the expanse of black asphalt behind Roosevelt Elementary has sat largely without shade; students playing basketball, hopscotch and dodge ball did so under the rays of the omnipresent Southern California sun. That finally changed Thursday morning. Students, teachers and volunteers from Warner Bros. shoveled, planted and watered their way to a little relief from the sun, adding 12 young trees to the dark tarmac.
NEWS
December 1, 2004
Jacqui Brown After spending about $5 million for a gymnasium and pool, dust and dirt are creating a problem for both facilities at Burbank High School. Principal Bruce Osgood said they won't know the cost of the damage for a while because of the dirt and dust that has been blown into the new gymnasium, scratching the floor and covering the pool with debris. "We have a phenomenal facility inside and out, but now that we have this dust problem we need to bring it to light before we incur further damage," Osgood said.
NEWS
August 7, 2004
ANNE LOUISE Maybe it's me ... but why is it so hard for kids to clean something? It has never seemed like a difficult concept to me: You see dirt, you remove dirt, you have clean. Fairly basic. The same concept applies to clutter: You see clutter, you put away clutter, you have neat. And yet, teaching these simple concepts to the children has been an almost impossible task. With seven people in the house doing the cluttering, and only one person in the house putting away the clutter -- and guess who that is -- the situation was getting out of hand.
NEWS
March 31, 2004
Jeff Tully Athletes had more to worry about than their fellow competitors Tuesday in the second Foothill League boys' golf match of the season at De Bell Municipal Golf Course. As the golfers were teeing off, course maintenance crews were busy in tractors aerating the fairways, leaving countless small dirt cylinders littering the venue. At one point, a Valencia player teed off on the first hole and his shot hit the back tire of one of the tractors, which caused the ball to ricochet off the fairway.
NEWS
July 16, 2003
JEFF TULLY Nothing gets a young player's attention quite like a mouthful of dirt. I should know, having dined on a sod sandwich as a young Little League baseball player. The incident brings to mind some of the of the wacky and unbelievable things I have seen coaches do over the years. The most memorable happening took place when I was 11 years old and playing for Aviation Little League in Hawthorne. Competing for the Major Division Braves, our team had to endure the old-school techniques and discipline of Jim Schofield, a drill instructor impersonating a coach.
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