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NEWS
April 16, 2014
Jefferson Elementary has a new hummingbird garden on its campus, which also features a butterfly habitat. Like the nearby butterfly area, the hummingbird garden has flowers, feeders and baths to welcome the small, energetic birds. The garden was built with help from a $2,000 grant ING Direct that helped pay for supplies. A local Boy Scout named Ryan Austin coordinated the overhaul of the garden area as his Eagle Scout project, said first-grade teacher Kim Anderson. Anderson's students, along with fifth-graders from teacher Tish Reed's class, will study, explore and maintain the garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | April 26, 2008
A garden with a natural stream and an English Tudor home featuring portions of a 17th century church are just a couple of highlights of the second home and garden tour this Sunday benefiting Verdugo Mental Health. The 2008 Gardens of Glendale and Beyond will offer a self-guided tour of five gardens and one home, with proceeds going to the center’s mental health programs, said Susan Eyraud, director of services and admissions at Verdugo Mental Health. The homes are in Glendale, La Crescenta and Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Rachel Kane | May 9, 2007
More than a dozen students at Monterey High School saw the fruits of their labor Friday afternoon in the form of a $1,000 check for their work on the campus garden. The California Fertilizer Foundation presented the check to the school's agriculture and science students, who tend the vegetable, fruit and flower garden. The money will provide for supplies and projects to further the work on the garden. "They already have their garden, so they're going to use the $1,000 to supplement for it," said Pamela Emery, director of programs for the California Fertilizer Foundation.
NEWS
October 30, 2004
Jacqui Brown Marcelo Irusta doesn't know much about gardening, but claims he's picking it up pretty fast after two days of weeding, clipping and turning soil. "I don't really like to get my hands dirty, and after being out here yesterday, it's not really that bad," Marcelo, 17, said. "I don't like being inside, so I took this class so I could help my teacher and be outside part of the time." Monterey High School's garden not only satisfies the life science and biology standards required by the state, it also satisfies the soul, according to Linda Pincu, teacher and instructor at the school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | January 24, 2007
Horticulturalist Lili Singer has secrets for creating a lowmaintenance garden that smells wonderful and attracts butterflies. She'll be sharing her expertise with the public Thursday during a city-sponsored lecture titled, "Native Nights." The lecture's purpose is to tell people how and why they should garden with California-native plants, said Singer, a garden writer whose column appears once a month in the Home section of the Los Angeles Times. It's a workshop for beginners, but experienced gardeners will also learn a lot, the Van Nuys resident said.
NEWS
By Rachel Kane | October 3, 2007
A dozen Burbank schools will get a little greener this year with the help of a $37,500 grant from the state. California Instructional School Gardens Program grants were awarded last week to districts across the state with schools that have existing or planned gardens that provide curriculum support. “It’s quite an opportunity that the state has provided,” said Sue Boegh, director of Educational Support Services. “It’s a onetime allocation for instructional school garden programs, and those are gardens that actually support instruction.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | November 13, 2013
A bench, featuring 800 hand-decorated butterflies made by students, teachers and administrators now adorns Thomas Jefferson Elementary, a tribute to the seven species of the brightly colored insects that flutter by the campus. Parents last week unveiled the remade bench where the fritillaries and the California Sister species of butterflies have been spotted among the plants and vegetables including carrots and sunflowers that students grow each year to pay homage to the country's third president and the garden he kept.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | November 16, 2013
At McKinley Elementary School on Friday, children poured soil into new garden beds as they prepared to plant their first winter garden of broccoli, onions, sweet and bitter lettuce, cauliflower, herbs, peas and carrots. The garden beds, soil and tools such as gloves, shovels and rakes were all awarded to McKinley after parent Jamee Tingley wrote a grant to the American Heart Assn. last year. The organization gave the school the equipment and seeds for the garden with the promise that students will cultivate fruits and vegetables for at least the next five years, said fellow parent Shari Wendt, who helped oversee children pour soil and plant seeds with other PTA members.
NEWS
April 26, 2003
Molly Shore One of the school district's best-kept secrets just might be the quarter-acre environmental garden at Washington Elementary School. But come May 3, its secret will be revealed. On that day, community members are invited to the garden's 10th anniversary party, planned by Washington's fifth-graders and students in John Burroughs High School's Interact Club. Several dedications are planned during the party, garden coordinator Dick Moskun said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Jefferson Elementary has a new hummingbird garden on its campus, which also features a butterfly habitat. Like the nearby butterfly area, the hummingbird garden has flowers, feeders and baths to welcome the small, energetic birds. The garden was built with help from a $2,000 grant ING Direct that helped pay for supplies. A local Boy Scout named Ryan Austin coordinated the overhaul of the garden area as his Eagle Scout project, said first-grade teacher Kim Anderson. Anderson's students, along with fifth-graders from teacher Tish Reed's class, will study, explore and maintain the garden.
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NEWS
By Bryan Mahoney | January 21, 2014
Bees are life-giving little insects that make our food possible, and they even make some of it on their own. They're fuzzy, colorful and cute in a six-legged freaky sort of way. They are also murderous, vengeful and spiteful purveyors of pain and calamity. You'll have to pardon my prejudice. I come from a long line of bee-allergy sufferers. My father once endured a sting on his face that engulfed his head and turned him into a fleshy facsimile of Homer Simpson. My own hand ballooned to the size of a catcher's mitt one summer; so swollen was my palm that I couldn't fit my baseball glove - literally a catcher's mitt - over my fingers.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | November 16, 2013
At McKinley Elementary School on Friday, children poured soil into new garden beds as they prepared to plant their first winter garden of broccoli, onions, sweet and bitter lettuce, cauliflower, herbs, peas and carrots. The garden beds, soil and tools such as gloves, shovels and rakes were all awarded to McKinley after parent Jamee Tingley wrote a grant to the American Heart Assn. last year. The organization gave the school the equipment and seeds for the garden with the promise that students will cultivate fruits and vegetables for at least the next five years, said fellow parent Shari Wendt, who helped oversee children pour soil and plant seeds with other PTA members.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | November 13, 2013
A bench, featuring 800 hand-decorated butterflies made by students, teachers and administrators now adorns Thomas Jefferson Elementary, a tribute to the seven species of the brightly colored insects that flutter by the campus. Parents last week unveiled the remade bench where the fritillaries and the California Sister species of butterflies have been spotted among the plants and vegetables including carrots and sunflowers that students grow each year to pay homage to the country's third president and the garden he kept.
NEWS
October 17, 2013
I was very pleasantly surprised when I read the Rev. Skip Lindeman's criticism of mean-spirited Republicans (In Theory, Oct. 5). These same Republicans are insisting that our poor and hungry should be more self-reliant when it comes to obtaining food. So, here's one solution: community gardens. I read in the L.A. Times how community gardens are really taking off. Many unused lots and parkways are left with weeds, broken glass and ants. We must stop the waste. Growing food gardens to help feed the needy and the hungry is a good start.
SPORTS
By Robert Fulton | September 7, 2013
BURBANK - Burbank High's football team kicked off a 2013 season filled with great expectations on Friday night at Memorial Field. If the performance against Bell Gardens is any indication, the Bulldogs' lofty goals this season are warranted. Burbank dominated Bell Gardens, 33-14, moving the ball on the ground and through the air. PHOTOS: Burbank High vs. Bell Gardens High football Bulldog quarterback Ryan Meredith was 10 for 13 for 163 yards and three touchdowns.
NEWS
By Bryan Mahoney | July 31, 2013
Anything would be better than the chemical-laden dust bowl next door. That's what Guy Vardaman thought last week while his neighbors debated where a community garden might go in Burbank. The Vardamans live next to the empty lot at Chandler and North Pass, one of two sites the city is considering converting into a community garden. It's owned by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, which occasionally sprays weed killer on the lot, turning the prime bikeway property into a wasteland.
THE818NOW
March 27, 2013
A 72-year-old gardener was found dead in the backyard pool of a Sunland home, and police believe it was a drowning. The renter of the single-family home in the 10900 block of Meseta Drive near Orcas Avenue came home around 6 p.m. Tuesday and saw his gardener's truck parked outside. Around 9 p.m., when he left for the store, he noticed the truck was was still there, but there was no sign of the gardener. He asked neighbors who also use the gardener, and they indicated they had not seen him. Continue reading > > -- KTLA-TV
COMMUNITY
By Joyce Rudolph | February 26, 2013
Jordan Middle School volunteers were up early Saturday morning building tables and benches or setting plants in neat rows for the Betty Steinkolk Literacy Patio and Garden, dedicated to the beloved former principal who died in 2009. The 3 p.m. ribbon-cutting ceremony was the culmination of a yearlong partnership between the Burbank Business Partners, Burbank Assn. of Realtors Community Service Foundation and the Burbank Noon Rotary Club, said Sue Georgino, board member of the Business Partners.
THE818NOW
By Joyce Rudolph | February 25, 2013
This post has been corrected. See details below. Jordan Middle School was a hub of activity all day Saturday as some 60 volunteers completed the literacy patio and garden dedicated to beloved former principal Betty Steinkolk, who passed away in 2009. The afternoon riibbon-cutting ceremony was the culmination of a yearlong partnership between the Burbank Business Partners, Burbank Assn. of Realtors Community Service Foundation and the Burbank Noon Rotary Club, said Sue Georgino, board member of the Business Partners.
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