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NEWS
June 24, 2000
Amber Willard HILLSIDE DISTRICT -- Using generators and solar power, local ham radio operators will gather in Brace Canyon Park today for a national field drill. Burbank Emergency Amateur Radio Service members will be joined by the APA Digital Communications Network, a group that uses computer communication over ham radio frequencies, starting at 11 a.m. today through 11 a.m. Sunday. "This is an important test of ham operators and their readiness to operate during a time of emergency," coordinator Rob Hanson said in a written statement.
FEATURES
By Christopher Cadelago | July 1, 2009
In the wake of a massive emergency and communications breakdown, when land, mobile and satellite phones become inoperable, ham radio could be the only means of communication, operators said. Following the Northridge earthquake, 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina, thousands of amateur radio operators, virtually all of them unpaid, hunkered down and assisted in relief efforts, said Mark Gershen, whose calls sign is KF6YAN. “Ham radio is the only fail-safe means of communication,” said Gershen, president of the Crescenta Valley Radio Club.
NEWS
July 26, 2000
Jenna Bordelon BURBANK -- The earth rolls. Someone smells gas. The television blips off. Your computer goes into permanent shut down. The cell phone hisses. Do you know what to do during a local disaster? The Burbank Emergency Amateur Radio Services group does. Known as the the "Bears," the members of this group are actually "hams." They operate amateur radios by using transmitters and receivers to communicate. Hams can communicate via computer -- called "packet radio" -- or by Morse code.
NEWS
March 19, 2003
Jackson Bell Eric Christensen says ham radio operators are more than just communication and gadget enthusiasts -- they are communication and gadget enthusiasts with a social conscience. "Earthquake, floods, fires -- ham operators get involved and assist in health and welfare during local and national disasters when public safety radio channels are overwhelmed," said Christensen, the manager of Ham Radio Outlet who has volunteered his services to the Burbank Fire Department and the L.A. County Sheriff's Department.
NEWS
March 25, 2000
Amber Willard MEDIA DISTRICT WEST -- A man who was legally blind fell to his death from his roof while adjusting a radio antenna, police said. Charles A. Lovell, 51, fell from the roof of his home in the 300 block of North Lima Street at 12:14 p.m. Thursday. He was a ham radio operator and neighbors told police they had often seen him on the roof, adjusting his antenna. Burbank Police Lt. Joe Latta said Lovell landed head-first on the sidewalk and apparently bled to death.
NEWS
June 26, 2002
Ryan Carter A group of BEARS spent the weekend at a local park, but instead of hibernating, they were communicating. These BEARS were members of the all-volunteer Burbank Emergency Amateur Radio Service who, along with other ham radio group APA Digital Communications Network, spent Saturday and Sunday on Burbank hilltops and parks for "Field Day." The event is a competitive field drill designed to test operating skills in the face of adverse conditions.
NEWS
May 5, 2001
James Winburn, People BURBANK -- Boy Scouts have invited youth organizations to share in this year's Scout-O-Rama so youngsters might see the things that help build strong American values. "Scouting Adventures" is the theme for the 48th annual exhibition, sponsored by the Verdugo Hills Council Boy Scouts of America. It will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 12, at McCambridge Park in Burbank. Local youth groups joining the Scouts are the YMCA, the Girl Scout Council of the San Fernando Valley, Burbank Rotary Club, Key Clubs from Burbank High and Providence High, Burbank Kiwanis Club, the Boys and Girls Club of Burbank and others.
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FEATURES
By Christopher Cadelago | July 1, 2009
In the wake of a massive emergency and communications breakdown, when land, mobile and satellite phones become inoperable, ham radio could be the only means of communication, operators said. Following the Northridge earthquake, 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina, thousands of amateur radio operators, virtually all of them unpaid, hunkered down and assisted in relief efforts, said Mark Gershen, whose calls sign is KF6YAN. “Ham radio is the only fail-safe means of communication,” said Gershen, president of the Crescenta Valley Radio Club.
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NEWS
July 26, 2000
Jenna Bordelon BURBANK -- The earth rolls. Someone smells gas. The television blips off. Your computer goes into permanent shut down. The cell phone hisses. Do you know what to do during a local disaster? The Burbank Emergency Amateur Radio Services group does. Known as the the "Bears," the members of this group are actually "hams." They operate amateur radios by using transmitters and receivers to communicate. Hams can communicate via computer -- called "packet radio" -- or by Morse code.
NEWS
June 24, 2000
Amber Willard HILLSIDE DISTRICT -- Using generators and solar power, local ham radio operators will gather in Brace Canyon Park today for a national field drill. Burbank Emergency Amateur Radio Service members will be joined by the APA Digital Communications Network, a group that uses computer communication over ham radio frequencies, starting at 11 a.m. today through 11 a.m. Sunday. "This is an important test of ham operators and their readiness to operate during a time of emergency," coordinator Rob Hanson said in a written statement.
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