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ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Scollon | April 15, 2006
I'm not sure where it was on the road of life that I got the idea that health food stores were full of things that didn't taste very good and should be avoided. But I do know where I was when I found out how wrong I was ? the Full O'Life Health Food Market and Restaurant in Burbank. Maybe I confused health food with foul-tasting diet food. Whatever. All I can tell you is that I feel like I've made a new friend, though I'm admittedly late to the party. Full O'Life has been a part of the community since 1959, making it one of the first natural food stores in the region.
NEWS
February 7, 2004
DAVID SILVA Shortly after I broke up with my girlfriend, Angel, I took a job as a clerk at a health food store in Costa Mesa. The job paid slightly above minimum wage, and my weekly hours were always kept slightly below the number at which the owners would have to provide me benefits. But the store was just a couple of blocks from my apartment and offered me a big employee discount inside its full-service restaurant, so I was happy. I've never been a big fan of health food, and never less so than when I was in my early 20s. Raised in a Puerto Rican household, I found the very thought of putting anything in my body that wasn't fried, pork-based or heavily salted almost offensive.
BUSINESS
By Christopher Cadelago | March 18, 2009
Rummaging through paperwork and knickknacks in an office atop Full O’ Life Natural Food Market and Restaurant, Chris Moon came across a periodical dated June 1959. “I plan on framing it,” said Moon, 26, the store’s produce manager. “It’s as old as this business.” Long before organic produce became almost as ubiquitous as frozen foods, before mega-chains with sky-high prices began posing as arbiters of all things healthy, Kathryn and Barney Matheson opened Full O’ Life, a market and eatery in the Magnolia Park neighborhood of Burbank.
NEWS
April 27, 2002
Ryan Carter MAGNOLIA PARK -- An 18-year-old health food store employee was arrested after he was allegedly found with two bombs made from dry ice. The Sun Valley man was arrested on suspicion of possessing an explosive device Thursday after police found the shrapnel of one "ice bomb" and another intact one, which they were concerned would explode behind Full O' Life at 2515 W. Magnolia Blvd. With a mixture of dry ice and other chemicals inside a container, pressure builds up inside an ice bomb, causing a capped container to explode, Burbank Police Sgt. Bill Taylor said.
NEWS
October 31, 2001
Molly Shore MAGNOLIA PARK -- When Kathryn and Edward "Barney" Matheson opened Full O' Life Foods in 1959, the couple was well ahead of the curve on health food trends. Forty-two years later, their pioneering efforts in nutrition have become the standard for many people who live and eat healthy. Before health food chain markets became popular, customers arrived at Full O' Life from all over the San Fernando Valley, even as far away as Thousand Oaks, recalled 80-year-old Kathryn Matheson, the family matriarch who oversees the daily operation of the business since Barney's death 10 years ago. The market and restaurant, 2515 W. Magnolia Blvd.
NEWS
February 5, 2000
Amber Willard MEDIA DISTRICT WEST -- Police are looking into who is responsible for etching a 6-inch swastika into the paint on the back door of a Burbank health food restaurant. An employee at Juice Heaven at 345 N. Pass Ave. noticed the marking Sunday and reported it to Burbank police Monday afternoon, said Lt. Robert Giles. The vandalism is being considered a hate crime because of its nature, Giles said. The store's owner, Sassi Mizrahi, said the incident was not reported when the marking was discovered because he was out of town.
NEWS
August 12, 2000
Erin Park BURBANK -- After no reported hate crimes in Burbank during 1999, police said four have been committed so far this year. "Hate Crime in California 1999," released recently by the California Department of Justice, reported that while the number of hate crimes increased in the state, Burbank defied that trend. The statistics, released July 27 by Attorney General Bill Lockyer, show that the number of hate incidents in the state rose by 12.1%, from 1,750 in 1998 to 1,962 in 1999 in California.
NEWS
March 24, 2004
Jackson Bell Aching arms, creaking necks and tense shoulders are one stroke closer to receiving relief when the City Council on Tuesday voted to update an ordinance that will loosen restrictions on chair massages for businesses and therapists. The council unanimously voted to introduce an amendment to a city ordinance that previously did not allow businesses whose primary function is not massage to offer chair-massage services. In addition, the ordinance would no longer require businesses providing chair massages to have a tub or shower on the premises.
NEWS
By Lauren Hilgers | March 25, 2006
Whole grain cereals were on the menu this Friday at schools across Burbank, along with fruit, milk and a lesson in nutrition. The wholesome breakfasts were delivered to all the schools in the Burbank Unified School District to celebrate good nutrition and to kick off a district-wide wellness plan that will be introduced to the Board of Education next month. "Exercise can be fun ? it's not punishment," said State Supt. Jack O'Connell to a crowd of students at Thomas Edison Elementary.
NEWS
December 10, 2003
Ryan Carter Massage therapy will become a lot easier in Burbank after the City Council voted Tuesday for a new ordinance to relax restrictions on the shoulders of some Burbank businesses and therapists. The council unanimously voted to direct staff to come back in February with an amended city ordinance that would allow businesses whose primary function is not massage to provide chair-massage services. Businesses offering chair massages would also not be required to offer a tub or shower facility on their premises, which is what the code currently requires.
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BUSINESS
By Christopher Cadelago | March 18, 2009
Rummaging through paperwork and knickknacks in an office atop Full O’ Life Natural Food Market and Restaurant, Chris Moon came across a periodical dated June 1959. “I plan on framing it,” said Moon, 26, the store’s produce manager. “It’s as old as this business.” Long before organic produce became almost as ubiquitous as frozen foods, before mega-chains with sky-high prices began posing as arbiters of all things healthy, Kathryn and Barney Matheson opened Full O’ Life, a market and eatery in the Magnolia Park neighborhood of Burbank.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Scollon | April 15, 2006
I'm not sure where it was on the road of life that I got the idea that health food stores were full of things that didn't taste very good and should be avoided. But I do know where I was when I found out how wrong I was ? the Full O'Life Health Food Market and Restaurant in Burbank. Maybe I confused health food with foul-tasting diet food. Whatever. All I can tell you is that I feel like I've made a new friend, though I'm admittedly late to the party. Full O'Life has been a part of the community since 1959, making it one of the first natural food stores in the region.
NEWS
February 7, 2004
DAVID SILVA Shortly after I broke up with my girlfriend, Angel, I took a job as a clerk at a health food store in Costa Mesa. The job paid slightly above minimum wage, and my weekly hours were always kept slightly below the number at which the owners would have to provide me benefits. But the store was just a couple of blocks from my apartment and offered me a big employee discount inside its full-service restaurant, so I was happy. I've never been a big fan of health food, and never less so than when I was in my early 20s. Raised in a Puerto Rican household, I found the very thought of putting anything in my body that wasn't fried, pork-based or heavily salted almost offensive.
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