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By Jeff Tully | October 2, 2009
BELLARMINE-JEFFERSON HIGH — For a number of years, because the girls’ volleyball coaches at Bellarmine-Jefferson and Providence highs were also graduates of their respective schools, the annual rivalry had an added dimension. Although Miguel Segura is back at the Bell-Jeff helm this season, the Pioneers have a new coach in Josh Eggleston, who didn’t attend high school locally. Despite not being a part of the rivalry until this season, Eggleston said he was well aware of the intense cross-town clash.
NEWS
October 7, 2000
Paul Clinton BURBANK -- In the face of mounting public concern about chromium 6 in the drinking water, city and county officials said they are moving to lower levels of the chemical in the San Fernando Valley Aquifer. Earlier this week, officials said that tests conducted on tap water at 110 county facilities revealed unexpectedly high levels of the carcinogen chromium 6, with the highest reading coming from the Burbank Health Center at 110 W. Magnolia Blvd.
NEWS
November 25, 2000
Irma Lemus BURBANK --Angered by what some are calling a lack of information from the Burbank Unified School District, parents of William McKinley Elementary School students are urging greater disclosure of chromium 6 levels found at schools. Aracely Taris, whose 7-year-old son, Andrew, attends McKinley, said she was oblivious to the issue until a Nov. 9 letter from the school stated students could bring bottled water with them. "It really upsets me, because the flier didn't say anything about chromium 6 being found in the water.
NEWS
By Arin Mikailian, arin.mikailian@latimes.com | April 26, 2014
Though state officials point to high levels of arsenic, chromium 6 and uranium in Burbank's water in a recent report , city officials claim the data is based on untreated groundwater, saying what flows out of residents' taps far exceeds mandated requirements. Sam Delson, a deputy director for external and legislative affairs for California's Office of Environmental Health Hazard, said Burbank toxicity score was based on data gathered from treated water, but local water officials contend this is not the case.
NEWS
August 30, 2000
Buck Wargo and Paul Clinton BURBANK -- As state and federal water regulators begin drafting safety standards for a cancer-causing form of chromium found in Burbank wells, city officials are reassuring residents that it's still safe to drink the water. City water officials have long known about the presence of hexavalent chromium, also known as chromium 6, in city wells. However, by the time water reaches Burbank businesses and homes it has been diluted enough to meet health standards, Public Service Department Assistant Manager Fred Lantz said.
LOCAL
By Jason Wells | March 10, 2007
BURBANK — About 2,400 bottles of Jermuk mineral water are being recalled from stores after they were found to contain unacceptable levels of arsenic. The order to recall Jermuk Natural Mineral Water Sparkling brand water came after U.S. Food and Drug Administration testing found 500 to 600 micrograms of arsenic per liter — well above the 10-microgram limit, the agency announced. The water — which is bottled in and shipped from Jermuk, Armenia — was distributed nationwide through three firms, including Glendale-based Kradjian Importing Co., and was also labeled as "Bottled by Jermuk Group CJSC" and "Sale Agent Kradjian Importing Co. Inc.," according to the FDA. Kradjian Importing Co. was notified of the recall Tuesday and has since been working to collect about 200 cases of the bottled water from smaller stores in Glendale, Pasadena, Burbank and North Hollywood, co-owner Vic Kradjian said.
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | November 22, 2010
Warner Bros. has decided to recall collectible glasses depicting well-known characters from its films and comic books after a study found they contain dangerous levels of lead. On Monday, the Associated Press published a study of collectable glassware revealing high levels of lead and cadmium in drinking glasses depicting characters from “The Wizard of Oz” and superheroes from D.C. Comics, which is owned by Warner Bros. Lead is a carcinogen especially harmful to children, and the Environmental Protection Agency has determined that cadmium is a likely carcinogen.
NEWS
December 14, 2012
Good morning, readers. Today is Friday, December 14. Residents in Van Nuys want a post office named after Marilyn Monroe. The movie star attended Van Nuys High School in the 40s. They also want a life-size statue in the building , reports the Contra Costa Times . A site once used to test rocket engines, now mostly owned by Boeing, has high levels of radiation , reports the SFV Business Journal . Patients at a Nothridge hospital...
BUSINESS
May 16, 2007
Firm names manager for Las Vegas office Workway, a Burbank based staffing firm, announced the addition of Deon Haynes as new branch manager of its Las Vegas office. Haynes will be responsible for developing relationships and providing customer service to the Las Vegas business community. The high level of growth in the Las Vegas area has created the need to expand Workway's staff, according to the announcement. Haynes has more than 10 years of experience in Las Vegas.
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NEWS
By Arin Mikailian, arin.mikailian@latimes.com | April 26, 2014
Though state officials point to high levels of arsenic, chromium 6 and uranium in Burbank's water in a recent report , city officials claim the data is based on untreated groundwater, saying what flows out of residents' taps far exceeds mandated requirements. Sam Delson, a deputy director for external and legislative affairs for California's Office of Environmental Health Hazard, said Burbank toxicity score was based on data gathered from treated water, but local water officials contend this is not the case.
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NEWS
December 14, 2012
Good morning, readers. Today is Friday, December 14. Residents in Van Nuys want a post office named after Marilyn Monroe. The movie star attended Van Nuys High School in the 40s. They also want a life-size statue in the building , reports the Contra Costa Times . A site once used to test rocket engines, now mostly owned by Boeing, has high levels of radiation , reports the SFV Business Journal . Patients at a Nothridge hospital...
NEWS
By Bill Kisliuk, bill.kisliuk@latimes.com | November 22, 2010
Warner Bros. has decided to recall collectible glasses depicting well-known characters from its films and comic books after a study found they contain dangerous levels of lead. On Monday, the Associated Press published a study of collectable glassware revealing high levels of lead and cadmium in drinking glasses depicting characters from “The Wizard of Oz” and superheroes from D.C. Comics, which is owned by Warner Bros. Lead is a carcinogen especially harmful to children, and the Environmental Protection Agency has determined that cadmium is a likely carcinogen.
SPORTS
By Jeff Tully | October 2, 2009
BELLARMINE-JEFFERSON HIGH — For a number of years, because the girls’ volleyball coaches at Bellarmine-Jefferson and Providence highs were also graduates of their respective schools, the annual rivalry had an added dimension. Although Miguel Segura is back at the Bell-Jeff helm this season, the Pioneers have a new coach in Josh Eggleston, who didn’t attend high school locally. Despite not being a part of the rivalry until this season, Eggleston said he was well aware of the intense cross-town clash.
LOCAL
By Jason Wells | March 10, 2007
BURBANK — About 2,400 bottles of Jermuk mineral water are being recalled from stores after they were found to contain unacceptable levels of arsenic. The order to recall Jermuk Natural Mineral Water Sparkling brand water came after U.S. Food and Drug Administration testing found 500 to 600 micrograms of arsenic per liter — well above the 10-microgram limit, the agency announced. The water — which is bottled in and shipped from Jermuk, Armenia — was distributed nationwide through three firms, including Glendale-based Kradjian Importing Co., and was also labeled as "Bottled by Jermuk Group CJSC" and "Sale Agent Kradjian Importing Co. Inc.," according to the FDA. Kradjian Importing Co. was notified of the recall Tuesday and has since been working to collect about 200 cases of the bottled water from smaller stores in Glendale, Pasadena, Burbank and North Hollywood, co-owner Vic Kradjian said.
NEWS
November 25, 2000
Irma Lemus BURBANK --Angered by what some are calling a lack of information from the Burbank Unified School District, parents of William McKinley Elementary School students are urging greater disclosure of chromium 6 levels found at schools. Aracely Taris, whose 7-year-old son, Andrew, attends McKinley, said she was oblivious to the issue until a Nov. 9 letter from the school stated students could bring bottled water with them. "It really upsets me, because the flier didn't say anything about chromium 6 being found in the water.
NEWS
October 7, 2000
Paul Clinton BURBANK -- In the face of mounting public concern about chromium 6 in the drinking water, city and county officials said they are moving to lower levels of the chemical in the San Fernando Valley Aquifer. Earlier this week, officials said that tests conducted on tap water at 110 county facilities revealed unexpectedly high levels of the carcinogen chromium 6, with the highest reading coming from the Burbank Health Center at 110 W. Magnolia Blvd.
NEWS
August 30, 2000
Buck Wargo and Paul Clinton BURBANK -- As state and federal water regulators begin drafting safety standards for a cancer-causing form of chromium found in Burbank wells, city officials are reassuring residents that it's still safe to drink the water. City water officials have long known about the presence of hexavalent chromium, also known as chromium 6, in city wells. However, by the time water reaches Burbank businesses and homes it has been diluted enough to meet health standards, Public Service Department Assistant Manager Fred Lantz said.
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