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High School Exit Exam

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THE818NOW
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | August 22, 2012
State education officials this week released data showing that 94% of high school sophomores in Burbank Unified last year passed the English test needed to graduate, while 93% passed the math portion of the test. The figures represent the results of the California High School Exit Exam scores taken between July 2011 and May of this year and were significantly higher than those posted in much larger Los Angeles Unified, where 77% of sophomores who took the test passed math and 76% passed English.
NEWS
January 3, 2001
Irma Lemus BURBANK -- As state legislators propose to make this year's High School Exit Exam a practice exam, the change is not expected to affect Burbank students. The original plan called for California students in the Class of 2004 -- this year's ninth-graders -- to take the exam on a voluntary basis in the spring. Students will be required to take the exam beginning in the 10th grade. Fearing that students may not be prepared for the high-stakes exam, the State Board of Education proposed last month to make this year's exam a practice exam.
NEWS
January 22, 2005
HIGH SCHOOL EXIT EXAM WAIVER CONSIDERED Last March, school board members waived the High School Exit Exam for special education students with learning disabilities, but school officials needed to write the guidelines. School board members considered those guidelines this week. WHAT IT MEANS If the principal of a student with learning disabilities can certify that the student has met all the requirements for gradua- tion then the student does not have to take the required high school exit exam to graduate.
NEWS
May 30, 2001
Gary Moskowitz BURBANK -- The high school exit exam made its first run through the school district's ninth-grade classrooms this year, though teachers and students did not know at the time of testing if the results would be counted. The exam is cumulative and tests students on a kindergarten through 10th-grade curriculum, which includes some material most ninth-grade students have not been exposed to. Senate Bill 2 -- passed last spring -- authorized the development of the High School Exit Exam, which must be passed by students in California public schools in order to graduate.
NEWS
June 22, 2005
Rosette Gonzales A majority of sophomores proved they were ready to graduate high school, according to high school exit exam results released Tuesday. This year, 88% of the sophomores tested in the Burbank Unified School District passed the exam's mathematics section, and 85% passed the English language arts portion of the state-mandated High School Exit Exam. The district tested more than 1,200 students in March, slightly more than last year, with results increasing each year since the district started giving the test in 2002.
NEWS
October 13, 2001
At times, government interdiction seems an obtrusive and manipulative way for bureaucracy to creep into every fold of our lives, but then there are other times when regulations seem almost necessary to maintain certain standards, either for safety purposes or for the achievement of excellence. Take, for example, the passage in March 1999 of California Senate Bill 2, which decreed that students who wish to receive their high school diplomas upon completion of their school studies must pass the California High School Exit Exam.
NEWS
October 5, 2002
Molly Shore Although school district officials are sweating the recently released results of high school exit exam scores, for Hilary Duran, an 11th-grader at John Burroughs High School, the exams are just another test. Hilary, 17, said she passed both the English and math tests in her freshman year. "I found it extremely easy because I was in geometry and the math portion only went up to geometry," she said, adding that she did not have to prepare for the exam by taking any special classes or spending any extra time cramming for it. "It all intertwines with what you learn in class," she said.
NEWS
December 19, 2001
Gary Moskowitz SOUTH SAN FERNANDO DISTRICT -- The Community Day School is working at full steam. Christine Krone, principal at Burbank's Community Day School, said 75% of her students -- most of whom were sent to her because of poor attendance -- now have significantly improved attendance and grades, and she has seen more of her students being placed back into comprehensive high schools and going on to earn high...
NEWS
November 25, 2000
Irma Lemus BURBANK -- Attempting to better prepare Burbank students for the state High School Exit Exam, the Board of Education has voted to make the test a requirement for ninth-graders. Passed into law last year, the exam requires that California students demonstrate a minimum level of knowledge in a variety of subjects before they graduate. The new exam goes into effect with the class of 2004 -- this school year's ninth-graders. According to state law, students must begin taking the exam in the 10th grade, and may take it up to three times a year until they pass it. The board's Nov. 16 decision makes the district one of a handful statewide that require ninth-graders to take the exam.
NEWS
December 12, 2001
Gary Moskowitz SACRAMENTO -- In an effort to even the playing field for disabled test-takers, the California Board of Education adopted a policy last week that ensures that disabled students are given necessary accommodations for taking the High School Exit Exam, board spokesman Phil Garcia said. "If disabled students are otherwise qualified to graduate, then the exam shouldn't affect that," Garcia said. "The policy says it doesn't matter if these modifications violate the original constructs of the exam.
ARTICLES BY DATE
THE818NOW
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | August 22, 2012
State education officials this week released data showing that 94% of high school sophomores in Burbank Unified last year passed the English test needed to graduate, while 93% passed the math portion of the test. The figures represent the results of the California High School Exit Exam scores taken between July 2011 and May of this year and were significantly higher than those posted in much larger Los Angeles Unified, where 77% of sophomores who took the test passed math and 76% passed English.
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NEWS
By Anthony Kim and Rachel Kane | August 25, 2007
BURBANK — California High School Exit Examination results released Thursday showed overall improvement in Burbank schools, but an ongoing achievement gap remains, prompting the state’s superintendent to urge educators to find ways to close it. “It’s been a concern for quite some time,” state schools Supt. Jack O’Connell said about the disparity in results among student groups. “The achievement gap is real. It’s glaring. It’s stark.
NEWS
By Ani Amirkhanian and Vince Lovato | August 30, 2006
BURBANK - More Burbank sophomores are passing the California High School Exit Exam on their first try, according to test results released by the California Department of Education Tuesday. This year, 91% of sophomores in Burbank Unified School District passed the math portion of the exam and 88% passed the English language arts portion. In 2005, 88% of sophomores passed the math portion on their first try and 84% passed the English Language Arts portion. Burbank students not only improved their pass record, but also scored above the state average.
FEATURES
By Mark D. Kaufman | May 17, 2006
Diana Abasta and Kim Allender are to be commended for their thoughtful, albeit misguided, commentary regarding the woeful condition of public education in California ("Time to be blunt about failing schools," May 6). While I agree with them regarding the state of public education, I respectfully differ with them as to the cause of this reality. As anticipated, they decry the various educational reforms, which have been implemented during the last several years, labeling them, "politically motivated and developmentally inappropriate."
FEATURES
By Diana Abasta and Kim Allender | May 6, 2006
In the timeless Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale of self delusion, "The Emperor's New Clothes," a young child, too naive to understand group pressure, speaks the obvious truth that others refuse to acknowledge. The story is often used as a metaphor for situations in which the overwhelming majority willingly share a collective ignorance of an obvious fact, despite individually recognizing the absurdity of the shared falsehood. We believe such is the case with the path of education reform over the past several decades.
FEATURES
March 4, 2006
Chandler changes not the right path Some Burbank politicians want to turn Chandler Boulevard into two one-way streets ? for "safety and reduced congestion," they say. But the change ("Council eyes Chandler changes," Jan. 18) would cause the exact opposite results. I've lived near Chandler for 23 years. I drive the area every day and night. I can tell you, there is no disagreeable congestion. And in that time I've seen maybe three or four people going the wrong direction.
NEWS
By: Sarah Hill | September 3, 2005
All but one school in the Burbank Unified School District met their growth targets on the Academic Performance Index, according to a report released Wednesday by the California Department of Education, and that school as already surpassed the state goal. "We're extremely pleased," said Joel Shaprio, the district's Director of Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment. "The API scores show all schools except for one grew, and there was exceptional growth among some schools."
NEWS
June 22, 2005
Rosette Gonzales A majority of sophomores proved they were ready to graduate high school, according to high school exit exam results released Tuesday. This year, 88% of the sophomores tested in the Burbank Unified School District passed the exam's mathematics section, and 85% passed the English language arts portion of the state-mandated High School Exit Exam. The district tested more than 1,200 students in March, slightly more than last year, with results increasing each year since the district started giving the test in 2002.
NEWS
January 22, 2005
HIGH SCHOOL EXIT EXAM WAIVER CONSIDERED Last March, school board members waived the High School Exit Exam for special education students with learning disabilities, but school officials needed to write the guidelines. School board members considered those guidelines this week. WHAT IT MEANS If the principal of a student with learning disabilities can certify that the student has met all the requirements for gradua- tion then the student does not have to take the required high school exit exam to graduate.
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