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By Rachel Kane | October 10, 2007
Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center will open a new healing facility next week, but not the kind that sets broken bones or stitches wounds. The Healing Gardens, a 25,000-square-foot lounging area at the heart of the hospital’s campus, is set to heal the souls of the hospital’s patrons and staff. It includes two koi ponds, shady sitting spots, an outdoor cafe eating area and a meditative walking path and is a part of the $151.7-million building project for the northeast tower at the hospital.
NEWS
By David Laurell | July 15, 2009
The lights of Izay Park glowed over Burbankers enjoying the simple summer pleasures of picnicking, watching children challenge the colorful playground equipment and catching a few innings of a softball game Friday night. If the artist Norman Rockwell were still alive, he would have found inspiration for one of his classic slice-of-American- life paintings at every turn. Just steps away from the park’s playground area, another group of folks were crossing the threshold of the Creative Arts Center to celebrate the opening of the gallery’s newest exhibit “Media Mix.” The reception, which showcased the work of local artists Peter Graziano , Ron Kriss and Antonio Pelayo , proved to be an interesting journey for family, friends, professional colleagues and supporters.
FEATURES
By Ryan Vaillancourt | September 15, 2007
As the sun settled at dusk Thursday on the backs of turtles bobbing in a koi pond at Brand Park, a heartfelt, sustained whimper echoed throughout the area. Meant to imitate the sound of a human’s cry, the noise came from a shofar — or ram’s horn — blown by Rabbi Simcha Backman, who led a Rosh Hashana service at the park. The traditional blowing of the shofar takes place during a moment of introspection in the service, when congregants summon their sins, grab hold of them and throw them away at the start of the Jewish new year.
THE818NOW
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | August 2, 2013
Motherhood. It can be draining even for the most prepared. But for one mallard duck, it almost took her life. Fortunately, her unlucky turn occurred at a hospital - Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, to be exact. For the past five years, ducks have used the koi pond at the hospital as a creche, but in March, this mallard - dubbed "Emilie" for Emilie Gamelin, founder of the Sisters of Providence - was left behind when her 13 ducklings took flight. The mother duck was left so weakened from her arduous term of motherhood that she molted her wing feathers, leaving her flightless - her condition exacerbated by an unhealthy diet of bread products provided by well-meaning visitors.
FEATURES
By Kyle Osborne | May 20, 2009
Paris, Rome and Glendale: These are the places we think of when fine art comes to mind. So, what’s wrong with this picture? Nothing! Because even though Glendale is far away from both Paris and Rome, we have great artists in our own backyard. And some of them have works entered in the annual Student Art Show continuing through June 6 in the Glendale Community College Art Gallery. The students come from various backgrounds, which adds to the individuality of the works, said Roger Dicks, a full-time art instructor at the college and gallery curator for the last four years.
NEWS
By Christopher Cadelago | May 5, 2010
The ducks are back at Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank. It marks the third consecutive year that a family of ducks have made their home on the grounds of the medical center campus. A mother duck last year commandeered a third-floor maternity ward balcony to hatch nine ducklings, and 12 in the same location the year prior. While the environment this year is more suitable for the water-loving foul, it’s not ideal, hospital officials said. Over the last three weeks, a mother and father duck hatched 13 ducklings at a newly constructed koi pond in the hospital courtyard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna Huffaker Evans | October 27, 2009
Student loans are due. The credit card is maxed. The mortgage payment’s late. And that’s just the mail, which is probably unread and heaped in a pile. Then there’s the worry that you’ll be a casualty in the next round of layoffs, and what if those stock prices don’t climb back up? These are stressful times, and stressful times call for meditative measures. To withstand today’s vexing economic climate, health professionals suggest that people take a mental timeout.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erica Liu | August 1, 2007
Works of art reflecting the many ways in which nature can be realized by the brushes or chisels of different artists will grace the walls and exhibiting space of the Burbank Creative Arts Center Gallery beginning Friday. The show, "Twenty-Nine Artists," will feature everything from paintings and drawings to mixed media, ceramics, wood carvings and cast bronze sculptures, said Charles Borman, a Glendale artist who organized and pitched the show to the gallery. Nature is also evident in the pieces Borman will be exhibiting in the show, which include three bronze pieces and a wood-carved totem pole depicting Southwest animals.
NEWS
By Joyce Rudolph | April 26, 2008
A garden with a natural stream and an English Tudor home featuring portions of a 17th century church are just a couple of highlights of the second home and garden tour this Sunday benefiting Verdugo Mental Health. The 2008 Gardens of Glendale and Beyond will offer a self-guided tour of five gardens and one home, with proceeds going to the center?s mental health programs, said Susan Eyraud, director of services and admissions at Verdugo Mental Health. The homes are in Glendale, La Crescenta and Los Angeles.
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THE818NOW
By Daniel Siegal, daniel.siegal@latimes.com | August 2, 2013
Motherhood. It can be draining even for the most prepared. But for one mallard duck, it almost took her life. Fortunately, her unlucky turn occurred at a hospital - Providence St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, to be exact. For the past five years, ducks have used the koi pond at the hospital as a creche, but in March, this mallard - dubbed "Emilie" for Emilie Gamelin, founder of the Sisters of Providence - was left behind when her 13 ducklings took flight. The mother duck was left so weakened from her arduous term of motherhood that she molted her wing feathers, leaving her flightless - her condition exacerbated by an unhealthy diet of bread products provided by well-meaning visitors.
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NEWS
By David Laurell | July 15, 2009
The lights of Izay Park glowed over Burbankers enjoying the simple summer pleasures of picnicking, watching children challenge the colorful playground equipment and catching a few innings of a softball game Friday night. If the artist Norman Rockwell were still alive, he would have found inspiration for one of his classic slice-of-American- life paintings at every turn. Just steps away from the park’s playground area, another group of folks were crossing the threshold of the Creative Arts Center to celebrate the opening of the gallery’s newest exhibit “Media Mix.” The reception, which showcased the work of local artists Peter Graziano , Ron Kriss and Antonio Pelayo , proved to be an interesting journey for family, friends, professional colleagues and supporters.
NEWS
By Rachel Kane | October 10, 2007
Providence Saint Joseph Medical Center will open a new healing facility next week, but not the kind that sets broken bones or stitches wounds. The Healing Gardens, a 25,000-square-foot lounging area at the heart of the hospital’s campus, is set to heal the souls of the hospital’s patrons and staff. It includes two koi ponds, shady sitting spots, an outdoor cafe eating area and a meditative walking path and is a part of the $151.7-million building project for the northeast tower at the hospital.
FEATURES
By Ryan Vaillancourt | September 15, 2007
As the sun settled at dusk Thursday on the backs of turtles bobbing in a koi pond at Brand Park, a heartfelt, sustained whimper echoed throughout the area. Meant to imitate the sound of a human’s cry, the noise came from a shofar — or ram’s horn — blown by Rabbi Simcha Backman, who led a Rosh Hashana service at the park. The traditional blowing of the shofar takes place during a moment of introspection in the service, when congregants summon their sins, grab hold of them and throw them away at the start of the Jewish new year.
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