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NEWS
March 8, 2003
Laura Sturza The Environmental Protection Agency has settled its case with Lockheed Martin Corp. for what the agency said was the corporation's failure to operate groundwater cleanup at full capacity. While the corporation did not admit fault about problems at the treatment facility in the 2000 block of Hollywood Way, it agreed to pay $260,000 to settle out of court. "We both felt it was better to enter into good-faith negotiation in an effort to resolve the dispute rather than going to court," Lockheed spokeswoman Gail Rymer said.
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NEWS
February 23, 2002
Laura Sturza LOS ANGELES -- Lockheed-Martin Corporation settled a lawsuit with forty plaintiffs who alleged that the company's chemical runoff contaminated Burbank water, causing illness, death or property damage. Terms of the settlement will be disclosed after they have been finalized in about two weeks, Lockheed spokeswoman Gail Rymer said. The trial was postponed when Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer broke her hip. This meant the case could be declared a mistrial, and that the parties might wait as much as a year for a new trial, Rymer said.
NEWS
December 29, 2010
In the article "Airport to raise parking fees" on Dec. 18, we strongly disagree with Lockheed Martin Corporation statements that it had nothing to do with live-fire training of its firefighters at Bob Hope Airport after 1963 (when the airport was still called Lockheed Air Terminal). Thousands of San Fernando Valley residents remember the thick black clouds of smoke near the west end of the airport when these training drills were conducted. Lockheed Martin is shirking its obligation to the residents of the San Fernando Valley to clean up its pollution legacy.
NEWS
October 18, 2000
Paul Clinton BURBANK -- A group of Burbank residents suing Lockheed Martin Corp. has accepted a $5-million settlement offer from the aerospace giant, according to their attorney. Lockheed had offered to pay approximately 400 current and former residents the money if they drop their "toxic tort" lawsuits claiming chemical byproducts from the firm's manufacturing operations caused cancer and other illnesses. The plaintiffs reluctantly accepted the money because the statute of limitations on their claims was running out. "I don't think any of my clients are happy with the settlement," attorney Thomas Foley said Tuesday.
NEWS
May 10, 2000
Paul Clinton BURBANK -- Lynnell Madrid is livid. Two days after a judge tossed out lawsuits brought by 140 Burbank-area residents who believe their health problems were caused by Lockheed Martin Corp., Madrid vowed to fight on. "It was just earth-shattering," Madrid said. "For four years we have been hoping for Lockheed to be held accountable for what they did to us." On Tuesday, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Carl West said attorneys for the 140 residents -- picked from a pool of nearly 3,000 because of the seriousness of their ailments -- didn't prove the aerospace firm was directly responsible for their health problems.
NEWS
December 1, 1999
Paul Clinton MEDIA DISTRICT NORTH -- The final piece of Lockheed-Martin Corp.'s sprawling Burbank property is on the market and may be soon be sold, company officials said. When Lockheed completes negotiations to sell its "A-1 North" property, the era of the aerospace giant's landowning empire in Burbank will come to an end. Part of the A-1 site, a 31-acre parcel adjacent to Burbank Airport, was the firm's headquarters until the early 1990s when Lockheed pulled up stakes.
NEWS
May 4, 2002
Laura Sturza BURBANK -- The Environmental Protection Agency has fined Lockheed Martin Corp. $1.3 million for failing to operate ground water cleanup at full capacity. The agency's findings, announced Thursday, will not affect the quality of Burbank's drinking water, said Fred Lantz, assistant general manager of Burbank Water and Power. Lockheed officials agreed. "The public should be reassured that this is not a water quality issue," Lockheed spokeswoman Gail Rymer said.
NEWS
February 26, 2000
Paul Clinton BURBANK -- A state appellate court dealt a setback to a group of former Lockheed Martin Corp. workers, when it reversed a lower court's decision to award $15.2 million in damages for health problems they suffered while employed by the aerospace firm. The 2nd District Court of Appeal tossed out damages against five oil and chemical companies Tuesday in Arnold vs. Ashland Chemical Co. In that case, 28 past and present Lockheed workers sued Ashland and others alleging the chemicals they used in aircraft manufacturing caused brain damage, cancer and other ailments.
NEWS
February 2, 2002
Laura Sturza LOS ANGELES -- Lockheed-Martin Corporation is facing trial after being sued by four plaintiffs alleging the company's chemical runoff contaminated Burbank water, causing illness or death. The firm paid $60 million in 1996 to 1,350 residents and $5 million in 2000 to 400 residents in out-of-court settlements related to cancer-causing chemicals first found in 1980 in Burbank. "These are the first ones (lawsuits) to actually go to trial," Lockheed Spokeswoman Gail Rymer said.
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