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NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | March 29, 2008
School was out for spring break at Bret Harte Elementary on Thursday, but a group of civic-minded volunteers were hard at work on school grounds. More than 40 Lockheed Federal Credit Union employees put down their pens, pushed away from their keyboards and picked up paint brushes, setting their sights on four fading portable classroom units that were left out of the school?s modernization efforts in 1999. ?We?ve always had these eyesore bungalows that no one has really done anything about,?
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NEWS
March 27, 2008
BY CHRIS WIEBE The Leader NORTHWEST DISTRICT — School was out for spring break at Bret Harte Elementary on Thursday, but a group of civic-minded volunteers were hard at work on school grounds. More than 40 Lockheed Federal Credit Union employees put down their pens, pushed away from their keyboards and picked up paint brushes, setting their sights on four fading portable classroom units that were left out of the school’s modernization efforts in 1999. “We’ve always had these eyesore bungalows that no one has really done anything about,” Principal Diane Berger said.
BUSINESS
By Lauren Hilgers | April 19, 2006
Since the factories closed and Lockheed Aircraft Corp. left town, aviation-focused Tony and Addie's Hobby Lobby has served as a reminder of Burbank's airborne past. Now, after more than 50 years, the little shop on Victory Boulevard is closing. "The time has come," said Tony Naccarato Jr., who took over the store after Tony Sr.'s death. "There are so many other things that I want to do." His parents ? Addie and Tony, who were both model-airplane connoisseurs in their own right ?
NEWS
July 7, 2004
Recently, we commemorated the 60th anniversary of D-Day and the dedication of the World War II memorial in our nation's capital. The sacrifices made and the lessons learned in World War II cannot be forgotten. World War II profoundly altered the course of history in the 20th century and shaped the world, as well as our own nation. World War II also profoundly affected the people of Burbank and transformed our city. In 1940, prior to the United States' direct involvement in World War II, Burbank's population was 34,337, with 11,132 houses.
NEWS
March 8, 2003
Laura Sturza The Environmental Protection Agency has settled its case with Lockheed Martin Corp. for what the agency said was the corporation's failure to operate groundwater cleanup at full capacity. While the corporation did not admit fault about problems at the treatment facility in the 2000 block of Hollywood Way, it agreed to pay $260,000 to settle out of court. "We both felt it was better to enter into good-faith negotiation in an effort to resolve the dispute rather than going to court," Lockheed spokeswoman Gail Rymer said.
NEWS
June 15, 2002
Re: Lockheed didn't abandon its history, June 12. Mary Jane Strickland questions my assertion that the "city [of Burbank], Lockheed or Airport Authority have done nothing to preserve any physical part of the Lockheed plant." I believe the statement is correct. To my knowledge, there is no physical remnant of the once great Lockheed facilities (A-1, B-1, B-6, C-5, etc.), including the birthplace of the Lockheed SkunkWorks. Nor is there any land from our former aviation production efforts that is dedicated to the memory of our aviation history.
NEWS
May 4, 2002
Laura Sturza BURBANK -- The Environmental Protection Agency has fined Lockheed Martin Corp. $1.3 million for failing to operate ground water cleanup at full capacity. The agency's findings, announced Thursday, will not affect the quality of Burbank's drinking water, said Fred Lantz, assistant general manager of Burbank Water and Power. Lockheed officials agreed. "The public should be reassured that this is not a water quality issue," Lockheed spokeswoman Gail Rymer said.
NEWS
April 20, 2002
Laura Sturza BURBANK -- Lockheed Martin Corp. will pay $1.25 million to settle a lawsuit with 40 residents who allege the company's chemical runoff contaminated Burbank water, causing illness, death and property damage. While the firm said it was able to "scientifically prove that we didn't harm anyone," Lockheed spokeswoman Gail Rymer said solvents did enter the ground water as the result of 60 years of operations. But she said "there is no cause and effect."
NEWS
February 2, 2002
Laura Sturza LOS ANGELES -- Lockheed-Martin Corporation is facing trial after being sued by four plaintiffs alleging the company's chemical runoff contaminated Burbank water, causing illness or death. The firm paid $60 million in 1996 to 1,350 residents and $5 million in 2000 to 400 residents in out-of-court settlements related to cancer-causing chemicals first found in 1980 in Burbank. "These are the first ones (lawsuits) to actually go to trial," Lockheed Spokeswoman Gail Rymer said.
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