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By Michael J. Arvizu | July 22, 2009
It was 40 years ago this week, on July 20, 1969, that Neil Armstrong said those immortal words: ?One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.? The video from those moon landings may be etched in our collective memory, but the quality of those recordings is poor. In the 1970s and ?80s, NASA, faced with a shortage of tapes, erased about 250,000 of them for reuse. In the process, the original lunar footage was lost. So tapes from CBS News, the National Archives, a video from Australia and footage from a camera pointed at a television monitor are being used by Lowry Digital in Burbank in an unprecedented effort to restore about three hours of footage from that historic moon landing 40 years ago. Lowry Digital, at 2777 N. Ontario St., is owned by Adlabs Films Ltd. Its primary function is to restore and repair old movies and television shows, and enhance new movies and new television shows whose picture quality needs help, said Lowry Digital President Mike Inchalik.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | October 2, 2009
Michael Mortilla keeps a lot of silent film lore tucked up his sleeve. It comes in handy when he’s accompanying the silent flicks on the keyboard for special screenings. In the early 1920s, film audiences watched the action on screen without dialogue or sound effects. A pianist played music to match the emotions the actors were feeling, Mortilla said. The practice continued until the first talkie — “The Jazz Singer” — was released in 1927. “In small cities, the piano accompanists were women because men were working,” the Burbank resident said.
NEWS
July 5, 2000
Claudia Peschiutta WASHINGTON -- Forget ideology and the nation's future. When picking a candidate to support in the 1968 California primary, James Rogan had other things on his mind. "I remember being for McCarthy because the cute girl in class liked McCarthy," he said. The fifth-graders were following the Robert Kennedy-Eugene McCarthy showdown for a class project. Naturally, sides were taken and teasing ensued. To irk young James, a friend on the opposite side gave him a Kennedy campaign pin. That night, James stayed up late watching television and saw Kennedy speaking to supporters outside the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles.
FEATURES
October 13, 2007
A congressional resolution recognizing the Islamic holy month of Ramadan as important is reportedly being touted by U.S. Muslims as an important sign that they are gaining acceptance in America and becoming part of the fabric of the country. But Rep. Tom Tancredo, R-Colo., argued that the resolution is nothing more than an example of political correctness, which he reportedly said has captured the political and media elite in the U.S. What do you think? .   The unanimous congressional resolution of Oct. 2 recognizing the month of Ramadan, the Islamic holy month of fasting and spiritual renewal, is another watershed event for the tradition of religious pluralism in our country.
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BUSINESS
By Michael J. Arvizu | July 22, 2009
It was 40 years ago this week, on July 20, 1969, that Neil Armstrong said those immortal words: ?One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.? The video from those moon landings may be etched in our collective memory, but the quality of those recordings is poor. In the 1970s and ?80s, NASA, faced with a shortage of tapes, erased about 250,000 of them for reuse. In the process, the original lunar footage was lost. So tapes from CBS News, the National Archives, a video from Australia and footage from a camera pointed at a television monitor are being used by Lowry Digital in Burbank in an unprecedented effort to restore about three hours of footage from that historic moon landing 40 years ago. Lowry Digital, at 2777 N. Ontario St., is owned by Adlabs Films Ltd. Its primary function is to restore and repair old movies and television shows, and enhance new movies and new television shows whose picture quality needs help, said Lowry Digital President Mike Inchalik.
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