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New Standards

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NEWS
June 25, 2005
Mark R. Madler DOWNTOWN BURBANK -- New apartments, condominiums and town homes will be subject to more stringent development guidelines following action Tuesday by the City Council. The new standards reduce by 30% the allowable density for multi-family housing and establish other changes relating to the look of the buildings. The 4-0 vote concluded an 18-month process to put together the new guidelines, including several meetings with residents and developer input.
NEWS
April 13, 2005
Mark R. Madler A study session between the City Council and Planning Division staff has resulted in suggestions to overhaul size standards for single-family homes. While the new standards may not be a cure-all to the problem of "mansionization" -- homes built out of character for a neighborhood -- they do fit in with the overall plan for how the council wants residential areas to develop, Councilman Todd Campbell said. "With our efforts to revise the land-use plan, we want to control densities and put the higher densities closer to the corridors that can handle them rather than in the neighborhoods," Campbell said.
NEWS
May 25, 2005
Mark R. Madler The City Council put development standards in place Tuesday night as a preventive measure against construction of large homes out of character for residential neighborhoods. The council voted unanimously, 5-0, to adopt the ordinance following a public hearing during which residents came out supporting and opposing the standards. It followed a year of community input and discussion between the council and staff. Neighbors were concerned about losing privacy, sunlight and views to larger homes.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | January 3, 2007
BURBANK — Officials from Burbank and Los Angeles have joined forces to oppose tightened water-quality standards from the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board, which they say would mean higher utility rates for customers. The new standards are so stringent that, in some cases, the caliber of water quality the board wants in discharge to be released into the Los Angeles River would even exceed the cleanliness of drinking water in Burbank, Mayor Todd Campbell said.
NEWS
September 13, 2013
Burbank's public school system is joining others in 45 states across the nation in implementing Common Core, the U.S. education initiative that require more rigorous curricula. It is hoped these new standards will better prepare our youth to succeed in college and the workplace. As is so true any time dramatic change is on the horizon, the idea of introducing the new lessons leaves some stakeholders a little on edge. And there is some understandable apprehension about the first wave of tests, in spring 2015, that will assess how well the standards have been taught and grasped.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | March 11, 2006
BURBANK ? The City Council passed an interim fence ordinance on Tuesday night that raises the height limit for residential fences by one foot in most cases and allows existing fences to stay up as long as they do not pose a safety hazard. A Blue Ribbon Task Force will be formed to review the interim standards before they are put in place permanently. Homeowners have been coming out en masse to protest changes to residential fence standards, but as it turns out, the outcry was much ado about, almost, nothing.
NEWS
October 25, 2000
Paul Clinton BURBANK -- State lawmakers urged environmental regulators to continue pushing for tighter standards for chromium 6 in drinking water, as well as more thorough monitoring, at a hearing Tuesday. The hearing comes as residents of Burbank, Glendale and neighboring areas grapple with questions about the safety of their drinking water in the face of limited scientific evidence about the chemical. Describing chromium 6 -- also known as hexavalent chromium -- as a "potent carcinogen" when inhaled, UCLA Public Health professor John Froines urged the lawmakers to further study the chemical and take the appropriate steps to ensure drinking water is safe.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | March 1, 2006
DOWNTOWN ? The City Council heard from residents Tuesday who weren't on the fence about interim standards that would limit the height and type of fences in residential areas until a permanent law is passed. The standards would increase the 3-foot height limit for frontyard fences set in 1967 to 4 feet. City staffers also recommend that fence heights increase from 3 feet to 6 feet in sideyards and wall heights be capped at 4 feet in front yards. Under the new standards, hedges would be limited to the same height as fences, chain-link and wire fences would be prohibited and parabolas and arbors in front yards would be allowed.
NEWS
By Christopher Cadelago | December 15, 2009
CITY HALL — A majority of the City Council last week criticized portions of a draft proposal that would reduce parking for downtown developers. The draft report on new standards for downtown development was slated to go before the Planning Board and then City Council for public hearings in January and February. But the council instructed city planners to bring it back early next year for further discussion after some questioned a proposed 5% to 10% reduction in the minimum parking requirements within a quarter-mile of the nearby Metrolink station.
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | August 9, 2013
Local public schools saw modest gains in English but a small dip on math test scores, according to data released this week by the California Department of Education. In Burbank, 69% of students tested as proficient or advanced in the English-language arts portion of the Standardized Testing and Reporting exam in 2013 compared to 68% who achieved the same in 2012. In math, 57% of students scored as proficient or better compared to the 58% of students who did the same the year before.
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NEWS
September 13, 2013
Burbank's public school system is joining others in 45 states across the nation in implementing Common Core, the U.S. education initiative that require more rigorous curricula. It is hoped these new standards will better prepare our youth to succeed in college and the workplace. As is so true any time dramatic change is on the horizon, the idea of introducing the new lessons leaves some stakeholders a little on edge. And there is some understandable apprehension about the first wave of tests, in spring 2015, that will assess how well the standards have been taught and grasped.
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NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | August 9, 2013
Local public schools saw modest gains in English but a small dip on math test scores, according to data released this week by the California Department of Education. In Burbank, 69% of students tested as proficient or advanced in the English-language arts portion of the Standardized Testing and Reporting exam in 2013 compared to 68% who achieved the same in 2012. In math, 57% of students scored as proficient or better compared to the 58% of students who did the same the year before.
NEWS
By Maria Hsin, maria.hsin@latimes.com | August 9, 2011
Aging playground equipment is due to be replaced at Santa Anita Playlot, Maple Street Playground, Brace Canyon and McCambridge parks as part of a roughly $671,000 overhaul. The city's Park, Recreation and Community Services Department has been planning on replacing play equipment throughout the city in order to maintain compliance with industry regulations, according to a city report. The replacement schedule is based on the age and condition of the equipment, with designs drafted to improve the play experience.
NEWS
By Christopher Cadelago | December 15, 2009
CITY HALL — A majority of the City Council last week criticized portions of a draft proposal that would reduce parking for downtown developers. The draft report on new standards for downtown development was slated to go before the Planning Board and then City Council for public hearings in January and February. But the council instructed city planners to bring it back early next year for further discussion after some questioned a proposed 5% to 10% reduction in the minimum parking requirements within a quarter-mile of the nearby Metrolink station.
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | April 22, 2009
GLENDALE — Local utility managers voiced support Tuesday for a bill that would force them to produce a third of their energy from renewable sources by 2020. The proposed law would help speed the development of power plants and transmission lines in California that could cut down on greenhouse-gas emissions, the managers said. While many of the state’s 46 utilities are not on track to meet the proposed mandate, Burbank Water and Power and Glendale Water & Power are both expected to meet the 33% goal by 2020 because they have joined with other utilities to build green energy plants in other states and transmit that power back to the Los Angeles area, managers said.
NEWS
By Alison Tully | August 13, 2008
BURBANK — After nearly an hour of debate, the City Council voted Tuesday to approve an ordinance that modifies height standards for fences and walls in the hillside area. The ordinance, approved by a 4-1 vote, is a solution to concerns raised by hillside residents that fences and walls negatively affect their views. It will require that fences or walls in a front yard be no more than 4 feet tall and incorporate an open design if it is over 2 feet, according to a city staff report.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | January 3, 2007
BURBANK — Officials from Burbank and Los Angeles have joined forces to oppose tightened water-quality standards from the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board, which they say would mean higher utility rates for customers. The new standards are so stringent that, in some cases, the caliber of water quality the board wants in discharge to be released into the Los Angeles River would even exceed the cleanliness of drinking water in Burbank, Mayor Todd Campbell said.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | March 11, 2006
BURBANK ? The City Council passed an interim fence ordinance on Tuesday night that raises the height limit for residential fences by one foot in most cases and allows existing fences to stay up as long as they do not pose a safety hazard. A Blue Ribbon Task Force will be formed to review the interim standards before they are put in place permanently. Homeowners have been coming out en masse to protest changes to residential fence standards, but as it turns out, the outcry was much ado about, almost, nothing.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | March 1, 2006
DOWNTOWN ? The City Council heard from residents Tuesday who weren't on the fence about interim standards that would limit the height and type of fences in residential areas until a permanent law is passed. The standards would increase the 3-foot height limit for frontyard fences set in 1967 to 4 feet. City staffers also recommend that fence heights increase from 3 feet to 6 feet in sideyards and wall heights be capped at 4 feet in front yards. Under the new standards, hedges would be limited to the same height as fences, chain-link and wire fences would be prohibited and parabolas and arbors in front yards would be allowed.
NEWS
July 13, 2005
Mark R. Madler Commercial aircraft using Bob Hope Airport already meet new federal rules for noise reduction enacted last week by the Federal Aviation Administration, airport officials said. The rule, issued on July 5, requires aircraft built after Jan. 1, 2006, to be 10 decibels quieter than many commercial aircraft now in use, Airport Executive Director Dios Marrero told the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority's Legal, Government and Environmental Affairs Committee.
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