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NEWS
August 31, 2002
Ryan Carter It's been 10 years, and a once-exper- imental program for paramedics is still going strong in the city and enhancing service, fire officials said. And City Council has again voted to keep it going. The department was selected in 1992 to be part of the county's Standard Field Treatment Protocols pilot program. At the time, because of the established success of the paramedic base station program, which began in the 1970s to provide a communications link between paramedics and a physician at a hospital, more power to treat patients in the field received a lukewarm reaction, Burbank Fire Marshal Dave Starr said.
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NEWS
November 29, 2000
Jenna Bordelon BURBANK -- A 4-year-old Arcadia girl who was trampled and gravely hurt by a horse at the Los Angeles Equestrian Center is at the hub of a brewing battle about center policy regarding 911 calls. Parents and friends of Eden Smith, who suffered seven broken ribs and a suspected air pocket in her lung, condemned the policies of the Traditional Equitation School at the center after officials did not quickly summon medical assistance after the incident.
NEWS
March 11, 2000
Amber Willard BURBANK VILLAGE -- The cake almost ruined the surprise when Terry Mencuri won Firefighter of the Year. Mencuri, who has spent almost 20 years with the Burbank Fire Department, was presented the award at Tuesday's City Council meeting. Before the meeting, Mencuri headed for the refrigerator in the kitchen at Station 11 and was stopped by several of his comrades. With weak explanations, they kept him from opening the refrigerator doors because inside was the double-layer white cake with whipped cream frosting announcing Mencuri's award.
NEWS
By Leslie Simmons | December 4, 1999
BURBANK -- One's chances of surviving a heart attack in Burbank are about to get a little beter. Beginning in January, seven Burbank fire engines and trucks will be equipped with a portable device any firefighter can use to help a stricken person's heart start beating before paramedics even arrive, said Battalion Chief Norm Stockton. The machine, known as an automatic external defibrillator, is designed for firefighters who are not trained as paramedics but who are often the first to arrive at an emergency call where someone's heart has stopped, he said.
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