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NEWS
November 22, 2000
After reflecting upon the meaning of Thanksgiving, and how I can celebrate the holiday in a way that is compassionate, healthful and environmentally sensitive, I have come to a conclusion. Thanksgiving is about life and liberty, but 330 million turkeys killed in the US each year experience neither. They are crammed into large sheds filled with toxic fumes. Their beaks and toes are trimmed to reduce damage from stress induced aggression. After 16 weeks of misery, they are beheaded by an electric saw, while still fully conscious.
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NEWS
November 30, 2002
Molly Shore Thanksgiving is not always a Norman Rockwell moment of friends and family feasting at an oversized table overflowing with food. For many seniors and shut-ins, it is a lonely time. But this year, as in past years, the Beverly Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center and the Joslyn Adult Center joined forces to bring a home-cooked meal to elderly residents. Joslyn recruited community volunteers to take holiday dinners to people who would otherwise not have a traditional Thanksgiving meal, said Renee Crawford, the center's social services supervisor.
NEWS
January 9, 2002
Joyce Rudolph Shakespeare's 'Romeo' put to Hall and Oates music BURBANK -- Troubadour Theatre Company, known for combining Shakespearean plays with contemporary music, is producing "Romeo Hall & Juliet Oates" at the Falcon Theatre in Burbank. The classic Shakespearean play becomes a madcap romp set to the 1980s rock and roll music of Hall and Oates. L.A. Drama Critics Circle Award-winning director Matt Walker assembled the cast of actors, musicians and clowns who sing and dance and trip the flip their way through the 90-minute musical excursion of potions, sword fights and star-crossed lovers.
NEWS
November 24, 2001
Laura Sturza BURBANK -- Nearly 100 homebound senior adults had a complete, hot Thanksgiving dinner delivered to their home Thursday by Boy Scouts and other community volunteers. The McShane family has been volunteering with the program for four years. Carol McShane, 44, said she sees the deliveries as "a real education," because her 15-year-old son, J.P., doesn't have the opportunity to interact with older people very much. J.P. is a scout with Burbank Troop 209. "We see a part of our community that otherwise remains hidden," she said.
NEWS
By Darrell Satzman | November 27, 1999
BURBANK -- It was an effort that warmed the hearts -- and stomachs -- of 85 Burbank residents who might otherwise have gone without this Thanksgiving. A few dozen local Boy Scouts, their families and city employees fanned out across Burbank Thursday, volunteering their time to deliver freshly prepared Thanksgiving meals and a bit of holiday companionship for seniors and other residents whose conditions prevent them from easily leaving their homes.
NEWS
April 24, 2004
Jackson Bell The federal pie was up for its yearly slicing as City Council portioned more than $1.6 million in grant money among several community groups and city programs. "This is the most difficult night of the year," Councilman Dave Golonski said at Tuesday's council meeting. "It's nice to be able to provide support to a lot of worthy organizations, but hard to make the tough choices between how much they get." The annual grants, given by the federal government to be doled out by the city, will bring about $250,000 to a dozen community groups.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | January 14, 2009
Filmmaker Hollis Zemany-McLachlan wants to help smooth the road for actors with disabilities who are pursuing a career in film. The Glendale resident is in the casting stage for a comedy that her independent film company, Pie Head Productions, is scheduled to start shooting in April titled “Pie Head (A Kinda True Story).” It will be her first full-length feature. “I am hoping that this will be a groundbreaking film in that we are casting a wide variety of actors with disabilities in ‘traditional’ roles, and of course, a few roles that were specifically written to accommodate special needs and disabled actors,” she said.
NEWS
By Carol Tensen | July 19, 2006
Regarding letter writer Patricia M. Griffin's Mailbag letter, "Adding Chinese makes no sense," July 12: As someone who took an Asian language in high school, I wanted to share my experience. In the '60s, I took Japanese in my junior and senior years through a program funded by the Ford Foundation. After graduation, I continued studying Japanese at the University of Washington to fulfill my undergraduate language requirement. In my early 20s, I got a job teaching English in Kobe, Japan, which I did for three years.
NEWS
November 24, 2004
Rosette Gonzales When Maria Alvarado walked into the Burbank Temporary Aid Center Friday afternoon dressed in business casual clothing, she appeared to be an employee, not a beneficiary, of BTAC's help. But Alvarado had just come from an interview. She's a single parent, struggling to provide for five children, and she's been unemployed for the last eight months. It's because of BTAC, Alvarado said, that her family will have a happy Thanksgiving.
NEWS
November 27, 2004
Rosette Gonzales When Maria Alvarado walked into the Burbank Temporary Aid Center dressed in business casual clothing, she appeared to be an employee, not a beneficiary, of BTAC's help. But Alvarado had just come from an interview. She's a single parent, struggling to provide for five children, and she's been unemployed for the past eight months. It's because of BTAC, Alvarado said, that her family will have a happy Thanksgiving. She signed up for a "basket" that includes turkey, canned vegetables, pie-filling, stuffing mix and more.
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