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By Ani Amirkhanian | November 18, 2006
Dressed in a traditional pilgrim girl outfit, Katherine Lyles adjusted her bonnet and smoothed her skirt as she anxiously awaited for the start of the annual Thanksgiving play at Jefferson Elementary School. Katherine, 8, and about 120 third-graders, sat on the stage in their costumes as parents and guests filled the school's auditorium on Thursday. Students had rehearsed for the play, "The Turkeys Go on Strike," since the start of the school year. Kyra Helfrich, 8, wore an orange shirt to portray her character: a squash.
NEWS
By y Ani Amirkhanian | November 22, 2006
Wearing paper bonnets, hats and feathered headbands, students told the story of the pilgrims' and Indians' first Thanksgiving in 1620. Students at Disney Elementary School presented a Thanksgiving play on Tuesday to celebrate the holiday and to help raise funds for needy students in Africa. After telling the story of the pilgrims and Indians, the students sang and used sign language to tell the audience what they were thankful for. "The Indians helped the pilgrims get food," said Melissa McKenna, 8, who played an Indian girl.
NEWS
By Allen E. Brandstater | January 7, 2009
Regarding “In Theorist misses the mark yet again,” Mailbag, Saturday: Someone does need “a refresher course in American history regarding the ‘pilgrims’ and our ‘revolutionary forefathers,’” but it’s not the Rev. Bryan Griem. Rather, it’s the author of the letter to the editor, Cynthia Cavanaugh, who’s in need of a refresher course. Cavanaugh reflects as to “why our forefathers established a separation of church and state in our Constitution.
NEWS
November 24, 2004
Jacqui Brown As millions of people prepare for this Thanksgiving holiday, Anita Nemoy's third-grade class at Disney Elementary School was looking back to the very first Thanksgiving and sharing it with their schoolmates as they performed on stage in the school's auditorium. In a short but sweet performance, the pilgrims and their Native American counterparts told the tale of suffering through long winters, and the lessons learned that helped them survive.
NEWS
November 22, 2000
Irma Lemus BURBANK -- Students dressing up for Thanksgiving might be fun, but school officials hope the holiday also is meaningful. At George Washington Elementary School, students began the week fully prepared for today's Thanksgiving events. Students made Native American headdresses and vests, as well as traditional pilgrim hats, to wear during their feast, said Joan Baca, Washington principal. For Kaylee Mackey, a second-grader at Washington, preparing for the holiday was educational.
FEATURES
By Lyda Truick | August 8, 2009
In the vast spectrum of historical fiction, a reader is hard-pressed to find much written about the 11th century. Aside from the trilogy “Rashi’s Daughters,” written by Glendale resident Maggie Anton, there are few novels featuring this era, and most focus on Charlemagne, the Crusades and Christianity-based story lines dealing with religious persecution. Throughout the three books, Salomon ben Isaac, a great Jewish scholar, instructs his three daughters in the teachings of the Talmud, which is the doctrine used in Judaism to explain the Torah.
NEWS
November 24, 2007
Times have definitely changed since that first American Thanksgiving feast 386 years ago in Plymouth. Back then, the fact that settlers could eat anything at all after a devastating winter that wiped out nearly half of their population, was among the very essentials of life that the Pilgrims could be thankful for ? well, that and how those gathered for the first feast survived smallpox, and the fact that they were helped by a local band of natives. Flash forward to today. We are a nation at war, and on many fronts divided.
NEWS
May 30, 2001
I am writing concerning the recent letters that condemn the use of an American Indian as a school mascot. Many letter writers are offended because they see the American Indian mascot as the singling out of a racial minority by a bigoted society. They also see the Burbank Unified School District as dishonoring these American Indian people. I can assure you that nothing is further from the truth. In her May 16 letter, Stephanie Saucedo writes, "Native Americans are the only ethnic race to be widely used as mascots for fun and games in this country."
NEWS
January 3, 2009
This filmmaker has decor to spare Regarding “Decorators shine in competition,” Dec. 17: This year, we were fortunate to have our home selected as one of the winners in the Burbank Civic Pride Committee’s Holiday Outdoor Decorating Contest. Peter Musurlian of Burbank Channel 6 called to say that he was doing a program on the winners and that he would like to interview us. We expected a television crew to show up. Musurlian was the crew. He was the camera operator, sound technician, lighting director and interviewer.
NEWS
November 24, 1999
NORTHWEST DISTRICT -- Teachers Chris Copeland and Bonnie Becken asked their third-grade students at Thomas Edison Elementary School to write what they are thankful for this year. The students had no trouble coming up with a wide range of reasons to count their blessings this Thanksgiving. Here's what a few of them had to say: I am thankful for the food on my plate because you need food. I am thankful for my family and friends because my friends and family help me a lot and I help them.
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NEWS
By Allen E. Brandstater | January 7, 2009
Regarding “In Theorist misses the mark yet again,” Mailbag, Saturday: Someone does need “a refresher course in American history regarding the ‘pilgrims’ and our ‘revolutionary forefathers,’” but it’s not the Rev. Bryan Griem. Rather, it’s the author of the letter to the editor, Cynthia Cavanaugh, who’s in need of a refresher course. Cavanaugh reflects as to “why our forefathers established a separation of church and state in our Constitution.
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NEWS
By y Ani Amirkhanian | November 22, 2006
Wearing paper bonnets, hats and feathered headbands, students told the story of the pilgrims' and Indians' first Thanksgiving in 1620. Students at Disney Elementary School presented a Thanksgiving play on Tuesday to celebrate the holiday and to help raise funds for needy students in Africa. After telling the story of the pilgrims and Indians, the students sang and used sign language to tell the audience what they were thankful for. "The Indians helped the pilgrims get food," said Melissa McKenna, 8, who played an Indian girl.
NEWS
By Ani Amirkhanian | November 18, 2006
Dressed in a traditional pilgrim girl outfit, Katherine Lyles adjusted her bonnet and smoothed her skirt as she anxiously awaited for the start of the annual Thanksgiving play at Jefferson Elementary School. Katherine, 8, and about 120 third-graders, sat on the stage in their costumes as parents and guests filled the school's auditorium on Thursday. Students had rehearsed for the play, "The Turkeys Go on Strike," since the start of the school year. Kyra Helfrich, 8, wore an orange shirt to portray her character: a squash.
NEWS
November 24, 2004
Jacqui Brown As millions of people prepare for this Thanksgiving holiday, Anita Nemoy's third-grade class at Disney Elementary School was looking back to the very first Thanksgiving and sharing it with their schoolmates as they performed on stage in the school's auditorium. In a short but sweet performance, the pilgrims and their Native American counterparts told the tale of suffering through long winters, and the lessons learned that helped them survive.
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