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THE818NOW
June 28, 2013
Burbank residents Paul Katami and Jeff Zarrillo - plaintiffs who helped take Proposition 8 all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court - are slated to be married by outgoing Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa this evening. The announcement came shortly after a federal appeals court opened the way for same-sex weddings to resume in California. Katami and Zarillo, together with a lesbian couple from Berkeley, were plaintiffs in the Proposition 8 case that was decided by the Supreme Court earlier this week.
NEWS
September 6, 2000
Paul Clinton CIVIC CENTER -- Although the original group of plaintiffs has been whittled down from 2,400 to about 200, an attorney representing current and former Burbank residents who blame Lockheed Martin Corp. for their health problems said Tuesday that the fight is not over. "We feel very confident on the remaining cases," Santa Barbara attorney Thomas Foley said. On Friday, in the latest action to pare down the litigant pool, Los Angeles County Superior Judge Court Carl West threw out 200 claims against Lockheed.
NEWS
May 10, 2000
Paul Clinton BURBANK -- Lynnell Madrid is livid. Two days after a judge tossed out lawsuits brought by 140 Burbank-area residents who believe their health problems were caused by Lockheed Martin Corp., Madrid vowed to fight on. "It was just earth-shattering," Madrid said. "For four years we have been hoping for Lockheed to be held accountable for what they did to us." On Tuesday, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Carl West said attorneys for the 140 residents -- picked from a pool of nearly 3,000 because of the seriousness of their ailments -- didn't prove the aerospace firm was directly responsible for their health problems.
NEWS
February 2, 2002
Laura Sturza LOS ANGELES -- Lockheed-Martin Corporation is facing trial after being sued by four plaintiffs alleging the company's chemical runoff contaminated Burbank water, causing illness or death. The firm paid $60 million in 1996 to 1,350 residents and $5 million in 2000 to 400 residents in out-of-court settlements related to cancer-causing chemicals first found in 1980 in Burbank. "These are the first ones (lawsuits) to actually go to trial," Lockheed Spokeswoman Gail Rymer said.
NEWS
February 23, 2002
Laura Sturza LOS ANGELES -- Lockheed-Martin Corporation settled a lawsuit with forty plaintiffs who alleged that the company's chemical runoff contaminated Burbank water, causing illness, death or property damage. Terms of the settlement will be disclosed after they have been finalized in about two weeks, Lockheed spokeswoman Gail Rymer said. The trial was postponed when Judge Mariana R. Pfaelzer broke her hip. This meant the case could be declared a mistrial, and that the parties might wait as much as a year for a new trial, Rymer said.
NEWS
October 10, 2001
Laura Sturza AIRPORT DISTRICT -- The most recent agreement between Southwest Airlines and plaintiffs in the crash of one of its 737 jets at the Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport in March 2000, was reached last Friday, officials said. In an effort to keep legal costs to a minimum, officials at Southwest admitted late last year to pilot negligence. This admission has helped move several cases to settlement, which are confidential, Southwest Attorney Christopher Young said.
NEWS
October 18, 2000
Paul Clinton BURBANK -- A group of Burbank residents suing Lockheed Martin Corp. has accepted a $5-million settlement offer from the aerospace giant, according to their attorney. Lockheed had offered to pay approximately 400 current and former residents the money if they drop their "toxic tort" lawsuits claiming chemical byproducts from the firm's manufacturing operations caused cancer and other illnesses. The plaintiffs reluctantly accepted the money because the statute of limitations on their claims was running out. "I don't think any of my clients are happy with the settlement," attorney Thomas Foley said Tuesday.
LOCAL
By Tania Chatila and Robert S. Hong | September 27, 2006
GLENDALE — A Los Angeles Superior Court judge denied a Metrolink request on Thursday to throw out more than 100 cases against the agency in connection with a 2005 train wreck that killed 11 people and injured nearly 200 others, officials said. There are 113 active lawsuits against Metrolink in connection with the incident, and 29 plaintiffs have settled, said attorney Edward R. Pfiester, who represents the wife of the conductor killed in the Glendale crash, among others. Judge Emilie Elias denied two motions made by Metrolink on Thursday — one to essentially throw out the cases, and another motion to uphold federal regulations over state law on the use of the controversial "push-pull" method, in which a locomotive pushes the train from behind in one direction but pulls in the other direction, Pfiester said.
NEWS
May 13, 2000
It's been nearly 10 years since Lockheed Martin Corp. pulled up its remaining stakes in the city and left Burbank residents to sort through a complicated and conflicting legacy. Few would argue with the tremendous accomplishments of Lockheed and the other aerospace companies that once made this city their home. Their engineering and manufacturing prowess earned Burbank a spot in the nation's collective consciousness long before Johnny Carson began making jokes about "beautiful downtown Burbank."
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NEWS
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene.tchekmedyian@latimes.com | October 16, 2013
A Burbank resident has filed a lawsuit against the city claiming that Burbank's long-running practice of transferring funds from the city's utility to its General Fund is illegal. The suit calls upon the court to order the city to quash the practice, records show. In a petition for writ of mandate filed in Los Angeles County Superior Court, Christopher Spencer argued that the city's practice of transferring utility funds to the city's General Fund, which pays for most public services, has illegally hiked up water rates to the point where they “exceed the reasonable costs” of providing the service.
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THE818NOW
June 28, 2013
Burbank residents Paul Katami and Jeff Zarrillo - plaintiffs who helped take Proposition 8 all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court - are slated to be married by outgoing Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa this evening. The announcement came shortly after a federal appeals court opened the way for same-sex weddings to resume in California. Katami and Zarillo, together with a lesbian couple from Berkeley, were plaintiffs in the Proposition 8 case that was decided by the Supreme Court earlier this week.
THE818NOW
June 26, 2013
Late last year, after the U.S. Supreme Court decided to take up the Proposition 8 case, Paul Katami of Burbank - one of the lead plaintiffs - expressed what he hoped would happen at its end. “We hope that history has taught us one thing: that the courts are there to protect us.” In a way, they were. In what experts are already calling a puzzling majority decision, the Supreme Court, in a procedural ruling, turned away the defenders of Proposition 8, the 2008 ballot measure that limited marriage to the union of a man and a woman.
THE818NOW
June 26, 2013
Five words this morning from one of the Burbank residents whose fight to overturn Proposition 8 has taken him and his partner all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court:  “On way to SCOTUS. Hopeful.” Those words, posted by Paul Katami on Twitter this morning, sum up much of what he and his longtime partner, Jeff Zarrillo, have said about their journey to the Supreme Court, which is expected to issue its ruling at 10 a.m. EST on gay marriage and California's voter-approved Proposition 8. The Burbank residents, together with a lesbian couple from Northern California, have been the lead plaintiffs against that measure, which defined marriage as being between a man and woman.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | November 3, 2010
The family of a Burbank teenager who had a sexual relationship with his middle school teacher has filed a lawsuit against the school district alleging that it failed to safeguard the student from an aggressive predator. In March, Amy Beck, a sixth-grade teacher at Jordan Middle School, shocked the Burbank community when she turned herself in to police for having sex with her then-14-year-old student, who has not been identified. The liaison took place from March to September 2009, and involved sex acts at the teacher's Burbank home and on the Jordan Middle School campus, according to the lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court for the Central District of California.
LOCAL
By Christopher Cadelago | March 20, 2010
A black police officer does not have a discrimination case against the Burbank Police Department, a judge ruled Thursday, dismissing Jamal Childs as a plaintiff in a lawsuit brought by five minority officers in May. The ruling by Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Joanne O’Donnell does not affect the other four plaintiffs, who allege numerous instances of race- and gender-based bias, harassment and retaliation, and that the department allowed...
LOCAL
By Melanie Hicken | January 12, 2010
GLENDALE ? Metrolink has agreed to pay roughly $39 million to settle all but one of the lawsuits filed against the agency in the aftermath of a January 2005 derailment that killed 11 passengers on the Glendale border, an attorney for the plaintiffs said Wednesday. Of the 186 complaints filed against the agency in the wake of the accident, all but one of the suits have been resolved, said Jerome Ringler, the lead attorney for the plaintiffs. All 11 wrongful death lawsuits have been settled, and 15 of the 16 serious-injury lawsuits have been resolved.
FEATURES
June 17, 2009
Plaintiffs should ease up on Disney In your June 10 and 13 editions you ran articles regarding claims that the Walt Disney Co. supposedly contaminated groundwater (“Disney dumped illegally, suit says,” June 10). The articles continued on regarding the opinions of the Burbank Rancho Homeowners Assn., the plaintiffs, who seek damages and penalties and are alleging violations by Disney despite a concurrent investigation by the state Department of Toxic Substances Control that revealed chromium levels in the area to be “below levels of concern” and within California environmental limits.
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