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NEWS
December 4, 2010
This is in response to Mike Antonovich's Nov. 24 letter "Not the proper time for a bag ban. " You wrote: "This is not the appropriate time in our efforts to clean up the environment ... " Really? When exactly is the appropriate time then? I believe we should have banned the plastic bag eons ago. In fact, we probably never should have started allowing plastic bags to be used. "Educating our residents on the harm of illegally disposing their plastic bags can be effective," you go on to say. Again, I say really?
NEWS
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene.tchekmedyian@latimes.com | August 27, 2013
Burbank residents are being asked to weigh in on a plan to implement a citywide ban on plastic bags. The Burbank Green Alliance and the Natural Resources Defense Council are co-hosting a community forum Wednesday to discuss plastic pollution and get residents' opinions on implementing a bag ban in Burbank. POLL: Should Burbank ban plastic bags? Featured speaker will be Ferris Kawar, recycling specialist for the Burbank Recycle Center, who plans to share information about the city's efforts to move the bag ban forward.
NEWS
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene.tchekmedyian@latimes.com | August 30, 2013
Local green groups hosted a community forum Wednesday to discuss the environmental and economic benefits of banning plastic bags in Burbank , with critics arguing that a ban would strip consumers of the convenience and freedom to shop with the bags, which they often reuse or recycle. The Burbank City Council is slated to decide next month whether to pursue a plastic bag ban, which would likely impact roughly 130 stores, 20 of which are retailers with buildings larger than 10,000 square feet, said Ferris Kawar, recycling specialist at the Burbank Recycle Center.
NEWS
By Bryan Mahoney | September 4, 2013
I get the default reaction to Burbank's soon-to-be-proposed ban on plastic shopping bags. I understand the warnings of "nanny state" and "Big Brother. " This is the right reaction in a democracy where government should fear the people and not the other way around. What I don't understand is the vehement adherence to this belief regardless of facts, especially on the subject of plastic grocery bags and the multi-angle method around which local groups are trying to reduce plastics' environmental impact.
NEWS
By Jeremy Oberstein | October 15, 2008
BURBANK — Proponents of banning plastic bags and Styrofoam in Burbank found an ally Tuesday, as the City Council asked staff members to move forward with a plan detailing ways to eliminate the environmental irritants. The plan, brought forward by Recycling Coordinator Kreigh Hampel, includes further educational outreach to businesses and a promise to support future state legislation — should any be enacted in Sacramento next year. “We’re not talking about a ban tonight, just education,” Hampel said at the meeting.
NEWS
By Gretchen Meier, gretchen.meier@latimes.com | February 8, 2011
Flair Cleaners in Burbank has over the past year successfully asked customers to get their clothes naked — that is without all the plastic wrapping and other packaging. In an effort to reduce waste, more than 30% of the customers at Flair now ask for their clothes naked, said store manager Ron Roscoe. Flair Cleaners at 337 N. Pass Ave. already uses biodegradable plastic bags to hang freshly cleaned garments, but it wants customers to ditch plastic completely. Last week the store gave away a free reusable dry-cleaning bag to everyone who came in with two or more items to be cleaned.
NEWS
December 1, 2010
Once again the 30-plus-year windbag, Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich, gets published in the Burbank Leader in his ongoing effort to make it 40 or more years at the public trough ("Not the proper time for a bag ban," Nov. 24). A while back, someone gave me some reusable bags. I use them all the time now — easier and more comfortable to handle, hold my groceries better, and don't cut into my fingers as plastic bags do. I am 76 years old. Come on seniors, get interested in new and innovative things, especially if they help the environment.
FEATURES
By Jeremy Oberstein | December 21, 2008
BURBANK — Fiona Soukup, a 45-year-old South African native with two young children, long ago eschewed using single-use plastic bags while shopping. For Americans, though, transferring from plastic to reusable bags is just starting to take hold. That challenge was illustrated Thursday in Burbank, when city workers fanned out at retail outlets across the city to educate shoppers on the environmental dangers of plastic bags. Employees with the city’s recycling center also handed out 2,500 green and brown reusable bags while asking consumers to talk on video about their transformation away from plastic during the second annual Day Without a Bag. “I think it’s awesome,” said Soukup, who now lives in Santa Clarita.
NEWS
By Jeremy Oberstein | October 18, 2008
BURBANK — Proponents of banning plastic bags and Styrofoam in Burbank found an ally Tuesday, as the City Council asked staff members to move forward with a plan detailing ways to eliminate the environmental irritants. The plan, brought forward by Recycling Coordinator Kreigh Hampel, includes further educational outreach to businesses and a promise to support future state legislation — should any be enacted in Sacramento next year. “We’re not talking about a ban tonight, just education,” Hampel said at the meeting.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 6, 2013
Re: “ Forum talks plastic bag ban ,” Aug. 31. Burbank, don't drink the Kool-Aid! There is no benefit to the plastic bag ban. So what do we all end up doing? Buying bigger plastic bags that eventually give out. Where do these bags go? Trash or recycle bins. So how are you eliminating the problem? Barbara Curren Burbank
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NEWS
By Bryan Mahoney | September 4, 2013
I get the default reaction to Burbank's soon-to-be-proposed ban on plastic shopping bags. I understand the warnings of "nanny state" and "Big Brother. " This is the right reaction in a democracy where government should fear the people and not the other way around. What I don't understand is the vehement adherence to this belief regardless of facts, especially on the subject of plastic grocery bags and the multi-angle method around which local groups are trying to reduce plastics' environmental impact.
NEWS
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene.tchekmedyian@latimes.com | August 30, 2013
Local green groups hosted a community forum Wednesday to discuss the environmental and economic benefits of banning plastic bags in Burbank , with critics arguing that a ban would strip consumers of the convenience and freedom to shop with the bags, which they often reuse or recycle. The Burbank City Council is slated to decide next month whether to pursue a plastic bag ban, which would likely impact roughly 130 stores, 20 of which are retailers with buildings larger than 10,000 square feet, said Ferris Kawar, recycling specialist at the Burbank Recycle Center.
NEWS
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene.tchekmedyian@latimes.com | August 27, 2013
Burbank residents are being asked to weigh in on a plan to implement a citywide ban on plastic bags. The Burbank Green Alliance and the Natural Resources Defense Council are co-hosting a community forum Wednesday to discuss plastic pollution and get residents' opinions on implementing a bag ban in Burbank. POLL: Should Burbank ban plastic bags? Featured speaker will be Ferris Kawar, recycling specialist for the Burbank Recycle Center, who plans to share information about the city's efforts to move the bag ban forward.
NEWS
By Gretchen Meier, gretchen.meier@latimes.com | February 8, 2011
Flair Cleaners in Burbank has over the past year successfully asked customers to get their clothes naked — that is without all the plastic wrapping and other packaging. In an effort to reduce waste, more than 30% of the customers at Flair now ask for their clothes naked, said store manager Ron Roscoe. Flair Cleaners at 337 N. Pass Ave. already uses biodegradable plastic bags to hang freshly cleaned garments, but it wants customers to ditch plastic completely. Last week the store gave away a free reusable dry-cleaning bag to everyone who came in with two or more items to be cleaned.
NEWS
December 8, 2010
I take issue with Jeri Anderson's letter in disagreement of Los Angeles County Mike Antonovich's position on plastic bags ("We can live better without plastic bags," Dec. 4). Everyone agrees that improperly discarded plastic bags make a mess. However, there are solutions and considerations, other than prohibiting the use of these bags, that we must discuss before we can solve this problem. First, how much harm to the environment do canvas bags cause in their manufacture, transportation and disposal?
NEWS
December 4, 2010
This is in response to Mike Antonovich's Nov. 24 letter "Not the proper time for a bag ban. " You wrote: "This is not the appropriate time in our efforts to clean up the environment ... " Really? When exactly is the appropriate time then? I believe we should have banned the plastic bag eons ago. In fact, we probably never should have started allowing plastic bags to be used. "Educating our residents on the harm of illegally disposing their plastic bags can be effective," you go on to say. Again, I say really?
NEWS
December 1, 2010
Once again the 30-plus-year windbag, Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich, gets published in the Burbank Leader in his ongoing effort to make it 40 or more years at the public trough ("Not the proper time for a bag ban," Nov. 24). A while back, someone gave me some reusable bags. I use them all the time now — easier and more comfortable to handle, hold my groceries better, and don't cut into my fingers as plastic bags do. I am 76 years old. Come on seniors, get interested in new and innovative things, especially if they help the environment.
NEWS
November 27, 2010
I completely disagree with Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich's "no" vote on banning single-use plastic bags in the county and his reasons for doing so ("Not the proper time for a bag ban," Nov. 24). He claims it puts an unfair burden on the consumer and businesses. I say not banning single-use plastic bags puts an unfair burden on our environment. And, like it or not, we need our environment to be healthy or we won't have anything left to consume. No one can deny that our environment has been badly abused.
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