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NEWS
April 3, 2012
[Re: “Graduating with a degree in police,” March 31] I participated in the Burbank Police Department's Community Academy Class No. 19. Of the 15 participants, three were Latinos and one was African American. We graduated after 13 weeks, on Nov. 20, 2008. It was one of my most rewarding experiences to receive an overview presented by many officers of their various job duties. I'm proud that Christian Diaz, who is one of the 15 graduates, chose to become a police officer for the Burbank Police Department after he graduated from the County of Los Angeles Sheriff's Academy Class No. 380 on Feb. 26, 2010.
NEWS
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene.tchekmedyian@latimes.com | January 3, 2014
Those interested in getting a “behind-the-scenes” look at police operations in Burbank can apply for the nine-week community police academy. Offered in English, Spanish, Armenian and for the deaf, the course gives participants a peek into the day-to-day operations of the various bureaus in the department. The free academy will offer presentations on the criminal justice system, air-support unit, Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team, patrol and detective functions as well as animal control programs.
THE818NOW
November 8, 2012
The Burbank Police Department has announced plans to begin offering its community academy program -- a behind-the-scenes look at police operations -- for Armenian-language speakers and the hearing impaired. “Our administration is trying to open up as many doors to the community and trying to include everyone we can,” said Burbank Police Officer Joshua Kendrick. Currently, the department only offers the program twice a year in English and Spanish. Open to those who live and work in Burbank, the academy will cover the criminal justice system, police training, traffic control, patrol and detective functions, the air support unit and the Special Weapons and Tactics team.
NEWS
January 30, 2002
Ryan Carter BURBANK -- As part of the ongoing effort to make a position with the Burbank Police Department more enticing, the city has boosted the pay of its police academy trainees. The City Council last week voted unanimously to raise the pay of police recruits from $3,112 a month to $3,885 -- a 25% increase. Police officials, who say they are dealing with a dearth of qualified applicants, were pleased. "The applicant pools are shrinking," Burbank Police Chief Thomas Hoefel said.
NEWS
July 6, 2002
Ryan Carter Mary Eltz is still working in the same city, but has gone from "PA" to "PD" in a matter of months. Eltz is among the Police Department's newest recruits, although her previous job had her in a different world. Before she went to the police academy and started patrolling local streets with her training officer, Eltz was a production assistant on the "Tonight Show with Jay Leno." It was a career path she almost committed to. "I did have an interest in going that direction," she said.
LOCAL
By Veronica Rocha | July 2, 2008
Burbank police recruit Robert Jacobson wanted to get up and out from behind his desk job and make a difference in someone’s life. Jacobson made the decision to alter his life forever, so he quit his job as a computer programmer and joined the police academy, he said. “I wanted to make a change,” the 28-year-old Granada Hills resident said. “I wanted something different.” Jacobson’s new life as a police officer will soon be realized.
NEWS
August 4, 2007
Producer wins case against studio Warner Bros. was ordered Thursday to pay an Academy Award-winning producer $3.2 million for failing to compensate him for profits derived from the sales of his films to television outlets. The Los Angeles Superior Court's decision sided with attorneys for Alan Ladd Jr., who argued that the studio did not share earnings from sales to television of films such as "Chariots of Fire" and the "Police Academy" series. The studio downplayed the value of several films, and Ladd and a business partner did not receive their fair share, the complaint said.
NEWS
June 20, 2001
Lolita Harper BURBANK -- When Todd Fatta was 22, he loaded his pickup truck with clothes and left his small-town roots on the East Coast to join what he believed to be one of the greatest police crime-fighting forces in the world -- the Los Angeles Police Department. "I always wanted to join the LAPD," he said. "They've always been known as a cutting-edge department." But seven years after realizing his dream to become an LAPD officer, Fatta made a lateral transfer to Burbank.
NEWS
October 20, 2001
Ryan Carter AIRPORT DISTRICT -- Burbank Airport Police officers will now be subject to more rigorous training standards, officials said. The Burbank-Glendale-Pasadena Airport Authority voted unanimously Monday to increase the number of training hours and adopt new accreditation criteria for its 19-member police force. The vote will require applicants for the Burbank Airport Police Department to be certified under criteria set by the California Peace Officers Standards and Training Commission, an appointed state board.
NEWS
By Gretchen Meier, gretchen.meier@latimes.com | August 28, 2010
Five Burbank teens received scholarships in honor of slain police Officer Matthew Pavelka. The Matthew Pavelka Endowment Fund was established after his murder in November 2003. Burbank had not lost an officer in a shooting since 1920. Within the first 24 hours following the incident, businesses and residents in Burbank and the surrounding communities responded with contributions in his memory, officials said. His parents, Mike and Sue Pavelka, requested that the funds be used to promote future leaders in the community.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene.tchekmedyian@latimes.com | January 3, 2014
Those interested in getting a “behind-the-scenes” look at police operations in Burbank can apply for the nine-week community police academy. Offered in English, Spanish, Armenian and for the deaf, the course gives participants a peek into the day-to-day operations of the various bureaus in the department. The free academy will offer presentations on the criminal justice system, air-support unit, Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) team, patrol and detective functions as well as animal control programs.
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THE818NOW
March 1, 2013
After getting an inside look at Burbank police operations - including demonstrations by the Special Weapons and Tactics team and presentations about gangs, forensics and force - members of the first-ever Armenian and deaf community academy classes have graduated. “You probably know a lot more now about the police department than when we began,” Burbank Police Officer Joshua Kendrick said Wednesday to the more than 30 Burbank residents who completed the seven-week course. PHOTOS: Burbank Police Department's first Armenian and hearing impaired community academy graduation ceremony Tigran Khachikyan, who graduated from the deaf class, said that before taking the course, he had problems with police and struggled to understand their operations.
THE818NOW
November 8, 2012
The Burbank Police Department has announced plans to begin offering its community academy program -- a behind-the-scenes look at police operations -- for Armenian-language speakers and the hearing impaired. “Our administration is trying to open up as many doors to the community and trying to include everyone we can,” said Burbank Police Officer Joshua Kendrick. Currently, the department only offers the program twice a year in English and Spanish. Open to those who live and work in Burbank, the academy will cover the criminal justice system, police training, traffic control, patrol and detective functions, the air support unit and the Special Weapons and Tactics team.
NEWS
April 3, 2012
[Re: “Graduating with a degree in police,” March 31] I participated in the Burbank Police Department's Community Academy Class No. 19. Of the 15 participants, three were Latinos and one was African American. We graduated after 13 weeks, on Nov. 20, 2008. It was one of my most rewarding experiences to receive an overview presented by many officers of their various job duties. I'm proud that Christian Diaz, who is one of the 15 graduates, chose to become a police officer for the Burbank Police Department after he graduated from the County of Los Angeles Sheriff's Academy Class No. 380 on Feb. 26, 2010.
NEWS
By Gretchen Meier, gretchen.meier@latimes.com | August 28, 2010
Five Burbank teens received scholarships in honor of slain police Officer Matthew Pavelka. The Matthew Pavelka Endowment Fund was established after his murder in November 2003. Burbank had not lost an officer in a shooting since 1920. Within the first 24 hours following the incident, businesses and residents in Burbank and the surrounding communities responded with contributions in his memory, officials said. His parents, Mike and Sue Pavelka, requested that the funds be used to promote future leaders in the community.
LOCAL
By Veronica Rocha | July 2, 2008
Burbank police recruit Robert Jacobson wanted to get up and out from behind his desk job and make a difference in someone’s life. Jacobson made the decision to alter his life forever, so he quit his job as a computer programmer and joined the police academy, he said. “I wanted to make a change,” the 28-year-old Granada Hills resident said. “I wanted something different.” Jacobson’s new life as a police officer will soon be realized.
NEWS
August 4, 2007
Producer wins case against studio Warner Bros. was ordered Thursday to pay an Academy Award-winning producer $3.2 million for failing to compensate him for profits derived from the sales of his films to television outlets. The Los Angeles Superior Court's decision sided with attorneys for Alan Ladd Jr., who argued that the studio did not share earnings from sales to television of films such as "Chariots of Fire" and the "Police Academy" series. The studio downplayed the value of several films, and Ladd and a business partner did not receive their fair share, the complaint said.
NEWS
July 26, 2003
Jeff Tully As a basketball point guard, Dave Ulloa is used to protecting the ball and serving up his share of assists to teammates. Although the former Hoover High graduate is still a force in the hoop game, Ulloa has found another way to protect and serve -- as a Los Angeles police officer. In a unique melding of his two passions, Ulloa, 28, has found a way to combine his love of basketball with his career in criminal justice. The eight-year Burbank resident is a sure-shooting player for the LAPD's talented basketball team.
NEWS
July 6, 2002
Ryan Carter Mary Eltz is still working in the same city, but has gone from "PA" to "PD" in a matter of months. Eltz is among the Police Department's newest recruits, although her previous job had her in a different world. Before she went to the police academy and started patrolling local streets with her training officer, Eltz was a production assistant on the "Tonight Show with Jay Leno." It was a career path she almost committed to. "I did have an interest in going that direction," she said.
NEWS
February 20, 2002
Ryan Carter BURBANK -- The Burbank Police Department's Community Class still has a few openings for students in its upcoming session. The academy will run from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Thursdays beginning March 14 through June 6 at the Police and Fire Headquarters, 200 N. Third Street. The goal is to help citizens develop a better understanding of police operations. In its last session, topics included officer recruitment, evidence collection and combating gang and domestic violence.
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