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By Joyce Rudolph | February 18, 2009
Frank Jacobs is the first to admit that his parodies of pop culture found in MAD Magazine are more familiar than his name, but that doesn’t stunt his prolific creativity. “I’m the least-known writer of hysterical light verse in the United States,” the Burbank resident said. He just submitted a comic piece for the humor magazine’s 500th edition coming out in April, and there is no end of that career in sight, he said. When he began writing for the magazine in the early 1960s, he was one of seven people writing 90% of the material.
NEWS
April 13, 2005
JUNE CASAGRANDE There are two kinds of people in the world: Those who try to speak and write the language correctly, who occasionally actually make the effort to look things up, who work to master their language. Then there are the people who couldn't care less. They're the smart ones. They figured out something the rest of us should learn fast: It's hopeless. Take me, for example. More than two years ago I considered myself sufficiently educated on the use of "whom" to write a column about it. Then, last week, I learned that I've been missing something all along.
NEWS
By Jonny Whiteside | March 21, 2014
Life in early 1960s America was a weird and wonderful combination of Cold War-era tension and congenial baby boomer Utopia. Our fractious, fun-loving state of mind allowed Pat Boone, Rat Fink, Connie Francis and Alfred Hitchcock to co-exist very comfortably, and a significant chunk of this pop culture was ruled by a horde of aliens and monsters. On the small screen, no series better captured America's shadowy side then science fiction anthology “The Outer Limits,” which literally took over one's TV set every week.
THE818NOW
April 8, 2013
Annette Funicello, the dark-haired darling of TV's “The Mickey Mouse Club” in the 1950s who further cemented her status as a pop-culture icon in the '60s by teaming with Frankie Avalon in a popular series of “beach” movies, died Monday. She was 70. Funicello, who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in 1987 and became a spokeswoman for treatment of the chronic, often-debilitating disease of the central nervous system, died at Mercy Southwest Hospital in Bakersfield, Walt Disney Co. spokesman Howard Green said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2006
Continuing in its tradition of offering weekend matinees for children, The Falcon Theatre in Burbank is offering a new ditty with just a teaspoon of Halloween spookiness called "Peter and the Wolf." This has very little to do with Prokofiev's symphony of the same name. There is no live classical music, no costumed wolves and just a little dancing. It does, however, include a boy named Peter who's visiting his grandfather in Russia. Plus a bit more. Peter is a modern American teen visiting his cousins in "mini-Moscow."
NEWS
July 5, 2000
Humorous cameos work Dean Briggs of Glendale is an actor. The pleasures of watching the Rocky and Bullwinkle show on television during the 1960s were many. The combination of characters and voices and absurd plots were wonderful. The movie, "The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle," succeeds on many of the same levels. The humorous cameos work in the movie by not trying to be more than what they are. The true heroes of the movie are Rocky and Bullwinkle and all in all the writing works.
COMMUNITY
By David Laurell | October 31, 2012
Take over the entire top floor of the office tower known as the Pointe, fill it with 250 of the city's government and business movers and shakers dressed as witches, devils, pirates, goths, ghouls, goblins, clowns and various pop-culture icons, throw in the musical showmanship of the Spazmatics, have it all benefit a good cause, and what do you get? You get one of the best darn parties Burbank has seen in years. Staged as a fundraiser for Leadership Burbank, a community-based organization that offers a nine-month program to assist people in enhancing their personal and professional skills and gain a deeper understanding of how Burbank works, Saturday evening's Spectacular Costume Party at the Top of the Pointe was chaired by Barry Gussow.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2006
If you're in the mood for laughs and have cash to blow, round up some friends and see "Scary Movie 4." Parents and grandparents can skip this flick. They won't be amused. "Scary Movie 4" is a comedy-spoof mix of horror movies and pop culture. If you've seen the previous three films, you know what I'm talking about. As expected, there isn't much of a plot, just a bunch of jokes thrown together making fun of films ranging from "The Village" to "War of the Worlds." Even though the film has "Scary Movie," in the title, the only scary things are the bad jokes and the dull humor.
NEWS
June 14, 2003
Jackson Bell Actor Kevin Bacon and a host of other celebrities will usher in AMC's new 16-screen theater Wednesday night with a fund-raiser and grand opening celebration that is expected to draw between 3,000 and 4,000 guests. A film tribute to Bacon and block party will introduce the 4,200-seat megaplex at 125 E. Palm Ave. to those who pay $25 each for the experience, Downtown Manager Gail Stewart said. "This will be the place to be," Stewart said.
NEWS
By Gretchen Meier, gretchen.meier@latimes.com | January 8, 2011
Stark white walls brought out the brightly colored art of Nelson De La Nuez on Thursday at Cartoon Network Studios in Burbank. With signs welcoming visitors to "Pop Land," the opening reception for De La Nuez's exhibit and book signing drew crowds to familiar pop-culture images with unique twists — Dorothy left behind by the Scarecrow, Tin Man and Cowardly Lion, and Alice in Wonderland chatting with Humpty Dumpty and Mr. Peanut. De La Nuez, a Hoover High School graduate originally from Havana, Cuba, has taken all the iconic pop images from his youth and splattered them on canvases in his Pop Americana series.
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NEWS
By Jonny Whiteside | March 21, 2014
Life in early 1960s America was a weird and wonderful combination of Cold War-era tension and congenial baby boomer Utopia. Our fractious, fun-loving state of mind allowed Pat Boone, Rat Fink, Connie Francis and Alfred Hitchcock to co-exist very comfortably, and a significant chunk of this pop culture was ruled by a horde of aliens and monsters. On the small screen, no series better captured America's shadowy side then science fiction anthology “The Outer Limits,” which literally took over one's TV set every week.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Joyce Rudolph | February 18, 2009
Frank Jacobs is the first to admit that his parodies of pop culture found in MAD Magazine are more familiar than his name, but that doesn’t stunt his prolific creativity. “I’m the least-known writer of hysterical light verse in the United States,” the Burbank resident said. He just submitted a comic piece for the humor magazine’s 500th edition coming out in April, and there is no end of that career in sight, he said. When he began writing for the magazine in the early 1960s, he was one of seven people writing 90% of the material.
NEWS
April 13, 2005
JUNE CASAGRANDE There are two kinds of people in the world: Those who try to speak and write the language correctly, who occasionally actually make the effort to look things up, who work to master their language. Then there are the people who couldn't care less. They're the smart ones. They figured out something the rest of us should learn fast: It's hopeless. Take me, for example. More than two years ago I considered myself sufficiently educated on the use of "whom" to write a column about it. Then, last week, I learned that I've been missing something all along.
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