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NEWS
January 26, 2002
What America is fighting for in the war on terrorism is basic principles of our democratic way of life. Throughout our history, Americans have rallied and unified, as they have now, when our basic rights and freedoms are under attack. But another hard-won right of American democracy, the right to a free and equal public education, has been under siege since the publication of "A Nation At Risk" during the Reagan administration in 1983. At the time, the commission that produced the report was criticized as being predisposed to find something wrong with public education, although most educators accepted the report as one more "turn in the road" in the long history of public education reform in the U.S. With the perspective of almost 20 years, it is now clear that "A Nation At Risk" was the linchpin of an evolving social and political attack to dismantle public education, not just reform it. In 1996, David Berliner and Bruce Biddle published their book, "The Manufactured Crisis," in which they point out the many distortions of data and intentional misinformation that became part of the presidential commission's report.
NEWS
December 23, 2000
The Burbank Board of Education, in an effort to upgrade and broaden its code of ethics, has decided to be more explicit in exploring the values underlying its 3-year-old code of ethics and its practice in order to assist its employees to recognize and accept their responsibilities. The focus of the school district is, I presume, upon the human condition as well as upon professionalism. The teacher, in exercising his or her professional expertise, also touches a total life situation, a fact that can be ignored by the teacher only at the price of ignoring vocation and mission.
FEATURES
By Mark D. Kaufman | May 17, 2006
Diana Abasta and Kim Allender are to be commended for their thoughtful, albeit misguided, commentary regarding the woeful condition of public education in California ("Time to be blunt about failing schools," May 6). While I agree with them regarding the state of public education, I respectfully differ with them as to the cause of this reality. As anticipated, they decry the various educational reforms, which have been implemented during the last several years, labeling them, "politically motivated and developmentally inappropriate."
NEWS
November 23, 2012
Public education has changed drastically. Technology, specialized magnet campuses, charter schools, the importance of Advanced Placement courses and standardized student tests - if you graduated even 10 years ago, odds are, you wouldn't recognize your alma mater today. It has become a field driven by the need to keep pace with the changing times, and a big part of that now involves competition among districts. And key in that race is becoming specialized. In doing so, districts can poach students from outside their boundaries - an important factor in state education funding - and boost their prestige.
NEWS
October 28, 2000
Of all the proposed educational reforms in the last year, the one with the least credibility is the vouchers, especially the one in Proposition 38. Mia Lee, of the pro-38 group, says that California's public education system is inadequate and that vouchers can help remedy the situation. Does she know that reduction of class size, the end of social promotion, the use of charter schools, mentoring and extracurricular support classes are all presently being used to help student achievement?
NEWS
By Anthony Kim and Rachel Kane | June 16, 2007
A piece of legislation that would drastically change the way schools are funded is receiving support from many school districts, including Burbank's, as it makes its way through Sacramento, said its proponents. Senate Bill 146, introduced by state Sen. Jack Scott, would overhaul the funding formula for California schools ? switching the focus of funding from student attendance to student enrollment. The change seems simple, but the implications are wide reaching, said Jim Wilson, chief consultant to the Senate Education Committee, which Scott chairs.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | October 28, 2010
Speaking Thursday at a conference in Burbank, U.S. Department of Education Asst. Secretary Thelma Melendez de Santa Ana said access to quality public education is the most pressing civil rights issue for the nation's school-age children. "The president, the secretary of education, Duncan, and his team, believe that an excellent education system is the surest way to the nation's prosperity," Melendez said. "We also believe that education is the great equalization, the one true path out of poverty for disadvantaged children.
NEWS
September 21, 2002
Molly Shore Entertainers and educators joined forces in Burbank's City Council chambers to plead for the arts to be restored as a greater part of public education. The two groups decried the critical shortage of arts programs -- from music and dance to drama and other forms of expression -- in California's schools and the lack of funding for such programs at a hearing Thursday morning headed by state Sen. Jack Scott, chairman of the California Legislature's Joint Committee on the Arts.
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | July 1, 2009
During his last day as superintendent of the Burbank Unified School District, Gregory Bowman sat in a bare-walled office as the faint sounds of string instruments rose from a stereo, one of his few remaining possessions in the room. Also in the office was a “retirement countdown” clock that had wound down to zero after two years and numerous resets. Bowman’s seven years as schools chief, 15 years as a district administrator and 44 years as an educator came to a close Tuesday, ending an era of reorganization and fiscal prudence that was a break from the recent past.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
The lawsuit filed against the state by the American Civil Liberties Union highlights what most people already know: Public education is no free ride. Fees for band uniforms and sports tournaments have long been in place, but over the years, they have spread to more and more aspects of school life — lab materials, supplemental books, rentals, field trips and extracurricular activities. It's no coincidence that these fees have propagated to fill the void left behind by the receding waters of state education funding.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 23, 2012
Public education has changed drastically. Technology, specialized magnet campuses, charter schools, the importance of Advanced Placement courses and standardized student tests - if you graduated even 10 years ago, odds are, you wouldn't recognize your alma mater today. It has become a field driven by the need to keep pace with the changing times, and a big part of that now involves competition among districts. And key in that race is becoming specialized. In doing so, districts can poach students from outside their boundaries - an important factor in state education funding - and boost their prestige.
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NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | September 23, 2011
Luther Burbank Middle School teacher Rebecca Mieliwocki on Friday was named a Los Angeles County Teacher of the Year, joining an elite group of educators recognized for their compelling classroom practices and dedication to students. “It is humbling,” said Mieliwocki, who has lived in Glendale with her family since 1995. “Just when you think you should feel puffed up, you actually feel really humble. I really feel like I am being recognized for just being who I am. I can't be anybody else but me, so to be noticed and nominated … is very exciting.” Mieliwocki and 15 other winners - dubbed the Sweet 16 - were selected from among the county's 75,000 teachers, and automatically advance to the California Teachers of the Year competition this fall.
NEWS
By Megan O'Neil, megan.oneil@latimes.com | October 28, 2010
Speaking Thursday at a conference in Burbank, U.S. Department of Education Asst. Secretary Thelma Melendez de Santa Ana said access to quality public education is the most pressing civil rights issue for the nation's school-age children. "The president, the secretary of education, Duncan, and his team, believe that an excellent education system is the surest way to the nation's prosperity," Melendez said. "We also believe that education is the great equalization, the one true path out of poverty for disadvantaged children.
NEWS
September 17, 2010
The lawsuit filed against the state by the American Civil Liberties Union highlights what most people already know: Public education is no free ride. Fees for band uniforms and sports tournaments have long been in place, but over the years, they have spread to more and more aspects of school life — lab materials, supplemental books, rentals, field trips and extracurricular activities. It's no coincidence that these fees have propagated to fill the void left behind by the receding waters of state education funding.
NEWS
September 12, 2009
Lawmakers continued work this week on reforming some of the state?s education laws to allow California to qualify for $4.5 billion in competitive federal stimulus grants. Federal officials administering the new Race to the Top stimulus fund believe the state does not meet the competition?s criteria. In order to qualify, California would need to improve flexibility for students in low-performing schools, increase accountability for teachers, improve transparency and better coordinate the use of electronic data systems to track students?
NEWS
By Zain Shauk | July 1, 2009
During his last day as superintendent of the Burbank Unified School District, Gregory Bowman sat in a bare-walled office as the faint sounds of string instruments rose from a stereo, one of his few remaining possessions in the room. Also in the office was a “retirement countdown” clock that had wound down to zero after two years and numerous resets. Bowman’s seven years as schools chief, 15 years as a district administrator and 44 years as an educator came to a close Tuesday, ending an era of reorganization and fiscal prudence that was a break from the recent past.
NEWS
By Anthony Kim and Rachel Kane | June 16, 2007
A piece of legislation that would drastically change the way schools are funded is receiving support from many school districts, including Burbank's, as it makes its way through Sacramento, said its proponents. Senate Bill 146, introduced by state Sen. Jack Scott, would overhaul the funding formula for California schools ? switching the focus of funding from student attendance to student enrollment. The change seems simple, but the implications are wide reaching, said Jim Wilson, chief consultant to the Senate Education Committee, which Scott chairs.
FEATURES
By Mark D. Kaufman | May 17, 2006
Diana Abasta and Kim Allender are to be commended for their thoughtful, albeit misguided, commentary regarding the woeful condition of public education in California ("Time to be blunt about failing schools," May 6). While I agree with them regarding the state of public education, I respectfully differ with them as to the cause of this reality. As anticipated, they decry the various educational reforms, which have been implemented during the last several years, labeling them, "politically motivated and developmentally inappropriate."
NEWS
September 21, 2002
Molly Shore Entertainers and educators joined forces in Burbank's City Council chambers to plead for the arts to be restored as a greater part of public education. The two groups decried the critical shortage of arts programs -- from music and dance to drama and other forms of expression -- in California's schools and the lack of funding for such programs at a hearing Thursday morning headed by state Sen. Jack Scott, chairman of the California Legislature's Joint Committee on the Arts.
NEWS
January 26, 2002
What America is fighting for in the war on terrorism is basic principles of our democratic way of life. Throughout our history, Americans have rallied and unified, as they have now, when our basic rights and freedoms are under attack. But another hard-won right of American democracy, the right to a free and equal public education, has been under siege since the publication of "A Nation At Risk" during the Reagan administration in 1983. At the time, the commission that produced the report was criticized as being predisposed to find something wrong with public education, although most educators accepted the report as one more "turn in the road" in the long history of public education reform in the U.S. With the perspective of almost 20 years, it is now clear that "A Nation At Risk" was the linchpin of an evolving social and political attack to dismantle public education, not just reform it. In 1996, David Berliner and Bruce Biddle published their book, "The Manufactured Crisis," in which they point out the many distortions of data and intentional misinformation that became part of the presidential commission's report.
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