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Quotation Marks

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NEWS
April 26, 2006
While I'm off in the Pacific Northwest hawking a book that Southern California readers like you helped inspire, I thought I'd share some of your thoughts. Take Lee Harris. Lee is fed up with misused quotation marks, like those in an ad that reads: "Herniated Disc?" (The quotation marks appeared in the ad exactly as seen here.) As Lee points out, inside these quotation marks, the ad means one of two things: "1. They are quoting someone who asked this question. 2. It indicates an irony or sarcasm ?
NEWS
By June Casagrande | July 8, 2009
A retailer in Athens, Ga., recently held a donation drive for the Salvation Army. But it wasn?t your typical ho-hum, run-of-the-mill canned food drive. No, this CVS store posted a sign making it clear that its customers were encouraged to drop off not cans but ?cans.? Around the same time, visitors to an unidentified theater were greeted with a sign inviting them to attend a meet-and-greet, not with donuts, but with ?donuts.? Elsewhere, a seafood retailer posted a sign telling customers, ?
NEWS
By June Casagrande | March 14, 2014
I've gotten a lot of emails recently about where to put periods and commas relative to quotation marks. The notes were prompted by a recent column in which I mentioned that, in American English, a period or comma always comes before a closing quote mark (as in "fella. ") rather than after one (as in "fella".). The responses I got, and there were quite a few, all made the same point: That's not logical. Sure, my correspondents conceded, it sometimes makes sense to put a period before a closing quote mark, for example in a sentence like: Joe said, "Take it easy, fella.
NEWS
By JUNE CASAGRANDE | January 3, 2007
blr-aword03 I can't pave a sidewalk, repair a computer or dry-clean a suit. And you sure as heck don't want me to groom your poodle. So who am I to tell people with all these skills and more how to use quotation marks in their business signs? In the more than three years that I've been writing this column, never once have I been tempted to write about the errant quotation marks you see around words like "free," "special," "please," "exit" and "crab meat."
NEWS
By JUNE CASAGRANDE | May 16, 2007
In American English, periods and commas always go inside the quotation marks. Always. Other punctuation marks follow different rules, as you'll see in a minute. But periods and commas are simple. It's just a style thing — no better or worse than the British style, which has different rules. But unlike most other usage guidelines that are hotly debated, this one has near universal support. The "Associated Press Stylebook," which governs most newspaper writing, and the "Chicago Manual of Style," which governs book writing, agree, along with every other American usage book I've seen: Periods and commas go inside quotation marks.
NEWS
By JUNE CASAGRANDE | October 4, 2006
Are you getting ready? Can you feel the excitement in the air? That's right, it's time to mark your calendar because National Punctuation Day is just 50 weeks away. And be sure to do a better job of marking your calendar than I did. That way you won't find yourself scratching your head and wondering how you missed out on a golden opportunity to write a brilliant and timely column, show off your hard-earned punctuation expertise and feel like Lynne Truss for a day. According to its website, National Punctuation Day on Sept.
NEWS
By JUNE CASAGRANDE | December 13, 2006
I'm not currently in therapy, but if I were, I think one session might go a little something like this. Me: "All the grammar Nazis are driving me nuts. I can't take it anymore." Therapist: "What grammar Nazis?" Me: "The ones I keep finding on the Internet." Therapist: "How do you keep finding them?" Me: "Well, I'm searching for them. I'm googling terms like 'grammar' and 'peeve' and 'makes me grate my teeth' and 'stick an ice pick in my ear.'" Therapist: "Why would you do that?"
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NEWS
By June Casagrande | March 14, 2014
I've gotten a lot of emails recently about where to put periods and commas relative to quotation marks. The notes were prompted by a recent column in which I mentioned that, in American English, a period or comma always comes before a closing quote mark (as in "fella. ") rather than after one (as in "fella".). The responses I got, and there were quite a few, all made the same point: That's not logical. Sure, my correspondents conceded, it sometimes makes sense to put a period before a closing quote mark, for example in a sentence like: Joe said, "Take it easy, fella.
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NEWS
By June Casagrande | February 24, 2010
When I worked in a grocery store, nobody but us clerk types cared that the computer code for Anjou pears was 028. When I worked as a waitress, customers didn’t care how we rolled the silverware. When I was in sales, clients couldn’t have been less interested in how my company divvied up sales territories or how I organized my Rolodex of leads. Looking back at my professional life, I’m shocked to see how much time I spent learning stuff that was completely useless outside of the job — jobs that, 99 times out of 99, I didn’t have for long.
NEWS
April 26, 2006
While I'm off in the Pacific Northwest hawking a book that Southern California readers like you helped inspire, I thought I'd share some of your thoughts. Take Lee Harris. Lee is fed up with misused quotation marks, like those in an ad that reads: "Herniated Disc?" (The quotation marks appeared in the ad exactly as seen here.) As Lee points out, inside these quotation marks, the ad means one of two things: "1. They are quoting someone who asked this question. 2. It indicates an irony or sarcasm ?
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