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Speed Humps

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NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | August 16, 2006
NORTHWEST DISTRICT — Residents who signed a petition appealing for speed humps to control traffic in their neighborhood may soon see relief from the city. Many California Avenue residents complained that drivers blatantly disregard posted speed limits, racing through the quarter-mile stretch between Burbank Boulevard and Wyoming Avenue in souped-up cars and motorcycles. "They go awfully fast," resident Louise Pisani said. "And there's a lot of children around who are always crossing the street."
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | March 8, 2006
BURBANK ? The City Council was set Tuesday to appropriate money from the general fund to put speed humps on Frederic Street, between Chandler and Magnolia boulevards. But by deadline, no vote had been taken on the matter. With the funding secured, crews could install speed humps in as little as two weeks, assistant director of Traffic Engineering Ken Johnson said. Tyner Paving Inc., the city's contractor, has agreed to install speed humps at $1,000 per hump, bringing the total project cost to $3,000, including signs and pavement markings.
NEWS
September 23, 2006
MCCAMBRIDGE LIGHTING The council unanimously authorized a contract with T&D Electric to upgrade exterior lighting for the athletic fields at McCambridge Park. City staffers targeted the park for upgrades after also considering Izay Park and Foy Park, but ultimately decided to make McCambridge a priority due to frequent public use of McCambridge's sports fields. WHAT IT MEANS McCambridge Park will be the first to receive an upgrade, after a November 2004 assessment pinpointed several city facilities in need of attention.
NEWS
February 16, 2002
Will Ray's article hit the nail right on the head. I would also like to add to it that if they synchronize the stoplights, we could also conserve energy by not having to stop and go as often as we do. I know personally that if I can catch the lights and not stop at every one of them, I have saved several gallons of gas, which is impossible in Burbank. About the speed humps: These speed humps can ruin the front end of your automobile over a period of time.
NEWS
February 6, 2002
After reading the Feb. 2 Leader, it looks like we can expect more speed humps on Burbank streets, this time around Empire Avenue side streets. This is almost getting to be a regular joke around our fair city: Whenever people find alternate routes that are faster, they get slapped down by the transportation planning gurus who want to slow them down. Here is the way Burbank handles traffic problems: First we build a huge new shopping center, then city officials are "surprised" that there is more traffic in that area, then they put up speed humps and stretch chokers which constrict street openings, thereby diverting traffic to main arteries that are already congested, and then they sit around and ponder where to build the next new shopping center in order to avoid the congestion that the last one created.
NEWS
April 9, 2005
Speed bumps are needed all over Thank you for the opportunity to voice my opinion on the necessity of speed bumps ("Residents driving in circles," April 2-3). I feel that it is it unfortunate, but the fact is, most people don't pay attention to their speed and oftentimes drive much too fast on residential streets. It's too bad that speed bumps would be necessary, but I feel that they are. Given the choice to drive courteously and not endanger us in our neighborhoods, it is my opinion that most people choose not to. I live on Lincoln Street, which is one street east of a street that has speed bumps.
NEWS
February 2, 2002
Laura Sturza BURBANK -- Concerns that a city and Caltrans plan would divert traffic to residential streets surfaced at a public meeting about the proposed traffic-relief project. The city will be ready to curb runoff traffic with measures including installing speed humps to discourage diverting drivers, officials said. The Jan. 23 meeting addressed proposals to extend Empire Avenue beneath the railroad tracks to connect with San Fernando Boulevard and to relocate the southbound Golden State (5)
FEATURES
By By Carolyn Berlin | February 8, 2006
In response to Jack O'Neill's Community Commentary, "Let's stop the personal attacks" in the Jan. 28 Burbank Leader, his comments struck me as odd -- that council candidate Bill Wiggins' record as a former city councilman and current airport authority commissioner were off limits. According to O'Neill, criticizing a voting record and actions as a public servant is a "personal attack." As an active supporter of Councilman-elect David Gordon's campaign I am very pleased that he won his first bid for election to City Council.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 2, 2008
The City Council approved the appropriation of $4,000 to build speed humps on Niagara Street between Victory Boulevard and Jeffries Avenue. Residents sent petitions to council asking for the speed bumps to help dissuade drivers from speeding in the area. WHAT IT MEANS The speed humps will now be installed on the avenue and are expected to resolve residents? ongoing traffic concerns. ? Council directed staff to implement the proposed modifications to the Sewer Lateral User Rebate Program.
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NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | August 16, 2006
NORTHWEST DISTRICT — Residents who signed a petition appealing for speed humps to control traffic in their neighborhood may soon see relief from the city. Many California Avenue residents complained that drivers blatantly disregard posted speed limits, racing through the quarter-mile stretch between Burbank Boulevard and Wyoming Avenue in souped-up cars and motorcycles. "They go awfully fast," resident Louise Pisani said. "And there's a lot of children around who are always crossing the street."
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | March 8, 2006
BURBANK ? The City Council was set Tuesday to appropriate money from the general fund to put speed humps on Frederic Street, between Chandler and Magnolia boulevards. But by deadline, no vote had been taken on the matter. With the funding secured, crews could install speed humps in as little as two weeks, assistant director of Traffic Engineering Ken Johnson said. Tyner Paving Inc., the city's contractor, has agreed to install speed humps at $1,000 per hump, bringing the total project cost to $3,000, including signs and pavement markings.
FEATURES
By By Carolyn Berlin | February 8, 2006
In response to Jack O'Neill's Community Commentary, "Let's stop the personal attacks" in the Jan. 28 Burbank Leader, his comments struck me as odd -- that council candidate Bill Wiggins' record as a former city councilman and current airport authority commissioner were off limits. According to O'Neill, criticizing a voting record and actions as a public servant is a "personal attack." As an active supporter of Councilman-elect David Gordon's campaign I am very pleased that he won his first bid for election to City Council.
NEWS
April 9, 2005
Speed bumps are needed all over Thank you for the opportunity to voice my opinion on the necessity of speed bumps ("Residents driving in circles," April 2-3). I feel that it is it unfortunate, but the fact is, most people don't pay attention to their speed and oftentimes drive much too fast on residential streets. It's too bad that speed bumps would be necessary, but I feel that they are. Given the choice to drive courteously and not endanger us in our neighborhoods, it is my opinion that most people choose not to. I live on Lincoln Street, which is one street east of a street that has speed bumps.
NEWS
April 2, 2005
Rosette Gonzales Jim Wyatt is going door-to-door in his neighborhood, and only a few bumps in the road will stop him. Wyatt and some of his Mariposa Street neighbors, between Magnolia Boulevard and Clark Avenue, constantly hear and see cars speeding down their street, they said. Wyatt is canvassing the blocks to get residents to sign a city petition to install speed bumps on Mariposa Street. "We don't have any speed-limit signs," said Wyatt, who lives two blocks from Walt Disney Elementary School and George Izay Park.
NEWS
February 16, 2002
Will Ray's article hit the nail right on the head. I would also like to add to it that if they synchronize the stoplights, we could also conserve energy by not having to stop and go as often as we do. I know personally that if I can catch the lights and not stop at every one of them, I have saved several gallons of gas, which is impossible in Burbank. About the speed humps: These speed humps can ruin the front end of your automobile over a period of time.
NEWS
February 6, 2002
After reading the Feb. 2 Leader, it looks like we can expect more speed humps on Burbank streets, this time around Empire Avenue side streets. This is almost getting to be a regular joke around our fair city: Whenever people find alternate routes that are faster, they get slapped down by the transportation planning gurus who want to slow them down. Here is the way Burbank handles traffic problems: First we build a huge new shopping center, then city officials are "surprised" that there is more traffic in that area, then they put up speed humps and stretch chokers which constrict street openings, thereby diverting traffic to main arteries that are already congested, and then they sit around and ponder where to build the next new shopping center in order to avoid the congestion that the last one created.
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