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NEWS
October 12, 2012
Twenty-five bucks here, 100 bucks there - multiply that by thousands and it can add up to one big problem for Burbank Unified. Legislation recently signed by Gov. Jerry Brown prohibits school districts from charging students fees for everything from transportation to away sports games to drama costumes. It was drafted in response to a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union that claimed the fees violated California's constitution, which guarantees a free public education to all students.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
With the May 15 deadline approaching for school districts to submit their formal list of teacher layoffs, the tension, frustration and protests have been mounting regarding figures that, by all accounts, appear to be unnecessarily inflated. In Glendale, the initial batch of pink slips sent out numbered 105; in Burbank, it was 85. But as in previous times of belt tightening, the final number of teachers who will end up actually being laid off will likely be far smaller. That’s because district administrators are held to state-imposed deadlines that force school boards as early as March to err on the conservative side when deciding how many teachers they might have to lay off. The arbitrary March 15 deadline does nothing but add unnecessary sticker shock to the price of decreased state education funding, and create a panicked sense of urgency among community stakeholders.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | March 17, 2007
BURBANK — Mayor Todd Campbell spent last week on a whirlwind trip to Washington, D.C., balancing his professional commitments as an environmental policy advisor with time spent lobbying the federal government on behalf of Burbank. Among the issues he discussed with federal legislators, including U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer and Rep. Joe Barton, were ways fiscal incentives could help cities make strides in gaining energy independence, incorporate more renewable energy into their power portfolios and slow the spread of global warming, he said.
NEWS
March 25, 2011
In the novel of Burbank politics, right about now would be the chapter that makes you wonder if it’ll ever pay off. Surely, the debate over whether it’s the fault of the authors — the community stakeholders and politicos that operate the political machine — or the readers — voters who can’t be bothered — won’t be settled here. However, it’s worth pointing out a glaring omission: election forums. One need only to take a look at the gripping transcript of Glendale politics, played every two years with more forums, some villainous, others benign, than you can shake a fist at. Some say the volatile, rough-and-tumble campaign cycles in our neighboring city represent all that’s wrong with politics, but at least voters there know an election is happening.
NEWS
May 16, 2009
Councilman David Gordon, reacting to proposals to increase water, electric, trash collection and sewer rates, hit the nail on the head Tuesday when he said “there’s going to be a reaction.” The proposed rate increases would add a combined $13 or so to the average monthly cost of receiving city services. This at a time when California residents are already being asked to “do their part” on Tuesday by swallowing a handful of bitter budget propositions.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | October 25, 2008
LOS ANGELES — County transit officials Thursday authorized $5 million to expand an automated train-stopping system on the region’s rail lines as an interim safety step until more advanced technology is procured. The Los Angles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority also directed staff members to get aggressive about securing state and federal funding to help offset the potentially staggering cost of implementing the “positive train control” system on Metrolink’s rail lines and trains.
LOCAL
By Jason Wells and The Leader | October 23, 2008
LOS ANGELES — County transit officials Thursday authorized $5 million to expand an automated train-stopping system on the region’s rail lines as an interim safety step until more advanced technology is procured. The Los Angles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority also directed staff members to get aggressive about securing state and federal funding to help offset the potentially staggering cost of implementing the “positive train control” system on Metrolink’s rail lines and trains.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | June 24, 2006
CITY HALL ? The City Council on Tuesday gave the go-ahead to Magnolia Park business and property owners to form a cooperative organization that aims to pool its resources in order to enhance the district's commercial climate. The proposed property-based business improvement district would collect an assessment from members ? based on a formula multiplying lot and building square footage by an amount between 2 cents and 12 cents ? to produce a $250,000 budget. At the discretion of the members, the budget might increase by a maximum of 3% per year.
NEWS
February 6, 2002
Laura Sturza BURBANK -- The Burbank City Council is accepting applications through March 1 for appointments to the city's Downtown Parking Management Committee. Preferably, an individual from each of the following groups will sit on the committee: a planning board member, a downtown stakeholders' association member, a Media City Center representative and one business from each of the eight blocks bounded by Angeleno Avenue, 1st Street, Magnolia Boulevard and 3rd Street.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 12, 2012
Twenty-five bucks here, 100 bucks there - multiply that by thousands and it can add up to one big problem for Burbank Unified. Legislation recently signed by Gov. Jerry Brown prohibits school districts from charging students fees for everything from transportation to away sports games to drama costumes. It was drafted in response to a lawsuit filed by the American Civil Liberties Union that claimed the fees violated California's constitution, which guarantees a free public education to all students.
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NEWS
March 25, 2011
In the novel of Burbank politics, right about now would be the chapter that makes you wonder if it’ll ever pay off. Surely, the debate over whether it’s the fault of the authors — the community stakeholders and politicos that operate the political machine — or the readers — voters who can’t be bothered — won’t be settled here. However, it’s worth pointing out a glaring omission: election forums. One need only to take a look at the gripping transcript of Glendale politics, played every two years with more forums, some villainous, others benign, than you can shake a fist at. Some say the volatile, rough-and-tumble campaign cycles in our neighboring city represent all that’s wrong with politics, but at least voters there know an election is happening.
NEWS
May 8, 2010
With the May 15 deadline approaching for school districts to submit their formal list of teacher layoffs, the tension, frustration and protests have been mounting regarding figures that, by all accounts, appear to be unnecessarily inflated. In Glendale, the initial batch of pink slips sent out numbered 105; in Burbank, it was 85. But as in previous times of belt tightening, the final number of teachers who will end up actually being laid off will likely be far smaller. That’s because district administrators are held to state-imposed deadlines that force school boards as early as March to err on the conservative side when deciding how many teachers they might have to lay off. The arbitrary March 15 deadline does nothing but add unnecessary sticker shock to the price of decreased state education funding, and create a panicked sense of urgency among community stakeholders.
NEWS
May 16, 2009
Councilman David Gordon, reacting to proposals to increase water, electric, trash collection and sewer rates, hit the nail on the head Tuesday when he said “there’s going to be a reaction.” The proposed rate increases would add a combined $13 or so to the average monthly cost of receiving city services. This at a time when California residents are already being asked to “do their part” on Tuesday by swallowing a handful of bitter budget propositions.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | October 25, 2008
LOS ANGELES — County transit officials Thursday authorized $5 million to expand an automated train-stopping system on the region’s rail lines as an interim safety step until more advanced technology is procured. The Los Angles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority also directed staff members to get aggressive about securing state and federal funding to help offset the potentially staggering cost of implementing the “positive train control” system on Metrolink’s rail lines and trains.
LOCAL
By Jason Wells and The Leader | October 23, 2008
LOS ANGELES — County transit officials Thursday authorized $5 million to expand an automated train-stopping system on the region’s rail lines as an interim safety step until more advanced technology is procured. The Los Angles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority also directed staff members to get aggressive about securing state and federal funding to help offset the potentially staggering cost of implementing the “positive train control” system on Metrolink’s rail lines and trains.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | March 17, 2007
BURBANK — Mayor Todd Campbell spent last week on a whirlwind trip to Washington, D.C., balancing his professional commitments as an environmental policy advisor with time spent lobbying the federal government on behalf of Burbank. Among the issues he discussed with federal legislators, including U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer and Rep. Joe Barton, were ways fiscal incentives could help cities make strides in gaining energy independence, incorporate more renewable energy into their power portfolios and slow the spread of global warming, he said.
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