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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2010
First Lutheran School of Burbank will offer "Time in the Son" summer camp program for children ages 5 to 10 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 7 through Aug. 13. An extended day-care program will also be offered to the children attending summer camp from 7 to 9 a.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. at no additional charge. Registration is $130, and weekly rates are $90 for three days a week and $130 for five days a week. For more information, call (818) 848-3076 from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Activities include daily chapel time, weekly field trips, computers and a talent show.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
Jack Volpei first heard about the YMCA's summer camp in 1963. He was told it would be good for his son, who was then 7 years old. And it was free. “I thought there was a catch,” Volpei said. That year, Volpei got involved with the Burbank YMCA. Every year since, he's helped the Y send more kids to camp through its sale of Christmas trees, the largest annual fundraiser for the Burbank YMCA Service Club. About 1,600 trees were sold last year. On Monday night, Volpei and his fellow volunteers prepared the lot, located at Victory and Burbank boulevards, by cleaning the lot and giving the trees a good watering.
NEWS
April 12, 2003
Laura Sturza Parents who were unhappy with the city's summer-camp registration method, which had people camping out in George Izay Park to be first in line, can use the city's new lottery registration system starting Monday. "We surveyed our folks and people were more interested in doing it online or randomly," said Mike Flad, director of Park, Recreation and Community Services. "[This way] everyone has the same opportunity to sign their kids up."
NEWS
May 11, 2002
A few years ago, I was driving down Olive Avenue past George Izay Park and spied an unusual scene -- scores of people sitting in lawn chairs, pitching tents, all queued along the sidewalk leading toward the Olive Recreation Center. Curious, I stopped and asked a bystander, "What are you guys in line for?" The somber reply: "Summer camp." Ah, summer camp. For kids, it begins the week after school ends in June. For parents, sign-up began at 7 a.m. May 4, when the choice spots in the summer camp programs at McCambridge, Verdugo and Robert Gross parks are ripe for the taking.
NEWS
December 14, 2002
The Muscular Dystrophy Assn. is accepting applications to fill volunteer positions as summer camp counselors for its camp July 6 to 12 at Loyola Mary- mount University in Los Angeles. Camp counselors must be at least 16, and physically able to lift a child. Each counselor is assigned to serve as a companion for a camper -- a young person between 6 and 21 who is affected by a neuromuscular disease. Counselors help their campers with daily activities such as feeding, bathing and dressing, and in recreational activities such as arts and crafts and swimming.
NEWS
June 25, 2003
Molly Shore Jasmine Hansen can scream really loud, and was encouraged to do so Wednesday as part of a summer camp program at First Lutheran Church School. "I would scream, and I would run and ask for help because I don't want to get kidnapped," said the 9-year-old, who was taking part in a role-playing exercise. Jasmine was one of 40 children 5 to 10 who listened and participated in Patrice Shattil's Keep Kids Safe program, which teaches children how to be safe when they're not at home or school.
NEWS
By Ani Amirkhanian | August 9, 2006
Sporting a red Mohawk and donning an orange T-shirt, Nikolas Bakas bounced off a mini-trampoline and landed feet-first on a mat. The 7-year-old repeated the gymnastics routine on Tuesday during a practice session at Golden State Gymnastics, a Burbank gym. Nikolas and other children his age and older took part in the last week of the Jumpin' Gymnastics Summer Camp. "It's been a really great summer," camp director Shannon Smith Grant said. "It's been our biggest summer camp yet."
NEWS
August 6, 2005
Sarah Hill Twirling a neon-colored friendship bracelet, Bailey Lagood, 10, listened to her friend Sydnee Valdes, 10, explain how she'd discovered butterflies, spiders and snails in different parts of the Verdugo Recreation Center. Sydnee and Bailey are participating in "Summer Daze," a daily summer camp program ran through the city of Burbank Park, Recreation and Community Services Department. It's a 10-week program that is about to start its eighth week on Monday.
NEWS
August 31, 2002
Jackson Bell Josh Mora didn't let anything, including his hearing impairment, keep him from participating in his favorite summer camp. He attended the 10-week Summer Daze camp at McCambridge Park, participating in all the activities with the other children. From arts and crafts to sports and swimming, and weekly excursions to attractions such as Universal Studios and Disneyland, the 8-year-old did it all with a little help from a sign-language interpreter.
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NEWS
By Bryan Mahoney | December 5, 2013
Jack Volpei first heard about the YMCA's summer camp in 1963. He was told it would be good for his son, who was then 7 years old. And it was free. "I thought there was a catch," Volpei said. That year, Volpei got involved with the Burbank YMCA. Every year since, he's helped the Y send more kids to camp through its sale of Christmas trees, the largest annual fundraiser for the Burbank YMCA Service Club. About 1,600 trees were sold last year. On Monday night, Volpei and his fellow volunteers prepared the lot, located at Victory and Burbank boulevards, by cleaning the lot and giving the trees a good watering.
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NEWS
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene.tchekmedyian@latimes.com | July 27, 2013
Gabriel Cordell had been on the road for about three months. The 42-year-old paraplegic was drenched in sweat, rolling his wheelchair through one of the most grueling stretches of his 3,100-mile, 99-day journey across the United States: the winding hills of Pennsylvania against the debilitating summer heat and humidity. By this point, he'd ripped through dozens of pairs of gloves, recorded hundreds of hours of footage for his documentary, "Roll with Me," and busted just one set of tires on his wheelchair after rolling through roughly 2,800 miles of land since taking off in April from the Burbank YMCA.
THE818NOW
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | July 25, 2011
Church Women United of Glendale hosts the 34th annual “Meals on Wheels” program from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 134 N. Kenwood St., Glendale. The salad bar luncheon will feature meat salads, fruit salads, deviled eggs and bread. Tickets cost $8. All proceeds assist those who can't afford the meal. Call (818) 243-9573. There are still seats available for children and teens to join Summer Acting Camp at Glendale Centre Theatre. The three-week camp session is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday from Aug. 1 through Aug. 22 at the theater, 324 N. Orange St., Glendale.
SPORTS
By Jeff Tully, jeff.tully@latimes.com | July 13, 2011
BURBANK — At no time in history has young girls and boys had so much to choose from when it comes to leisure activities. From satellite and cable television with hundreds of channels, movies on DVD, computers and computer games and music on the go to suit any taste from rap to country, children have a multitude of choices. But even with so many couch-potato selections, many youngsters are still choosing to take part in athletics and sporting endeavors. In the summer in Burbank, young boys and girls have traditionally had a wide variety of sporting choices.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2010
First Lutheran School of Burbank will offer "Time in the Son" summer camp program for children ages 5 to 10 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 7 through Aug. 13. An extended day-care program will also be offered to the children attending summer camp from 7 to 9 a.m. and 4 to 6 p.m. at no additional charge. Registration is $130, and weekly rates are $90 for three days a week and $130 for five days a week. For more information, call (818) 848-3076 from 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Activities include daily chapel time, weekly field trips, computers and a talent show.
NEWS
By Billie Barron | August 13, 2008
This letter is in response to the question, “Should sober-living facilities be put in residential areas?” (“Suicide riles neighborhood,” Aug. 2-3). Similar questions have been asked when the public expresses concerns about developing landfill areas, constructing new prisons and power plants. The answer is generally the same: Not in my backyard. The suicide that took place at the sober-living facility is unfortunate. Suicide under any circumstances is a tragedy and horrific.
SPORTS
By JEFF TULLY | August 19, 2006
Forget my birthday, Easter or even Christmas, when I was growing up, my favorite day of the year was hands down the first day of summer. Much like my cellphone bill now, summer seemed to go on forever when I was a child. And on the first day of my wondrous vacation from the rigors of school, my head was crammed with ideas and plans of how I was going to spend the next three months. However, all that excitement had all but faded by the time the dog days of summer came around.
NEWS
By Ani Amirkhanian | August 9, 2006
Sporting a red Mohawk and donning an orange T-shirt, Nikolas Bakas bounced off a mini-trampoline and landed feet-first on a mat. The 7-year-old repeated the gymnastics routine on Tuesday during a practice session at Golden State Gymnastics, a Burbank gym. Nikolas and other children his age and older took part in the last week of the Jumpin' Gymnastics Summer Camp. "It's been a really great summer," camp director Shannon Smith Grant said. "It's been our biggest summer camp yet."
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | July 8, 2006
HILLSIDE DISTRICT ? Stough Park bustled with youthful vibrancy on Thursday, as 40 novice hikers, 3 to 5 years old, gathered for a morning trek. The expedition was a part of the Stough Canyon Nature Center's annual summer camp, a program designed to teach children about the outdoors and, of course, have a little fun in the process, said Recreation Leader Mike McHorney, as he kept an eye on the swarming campers. "The hardest part of my job is remembering all of their names," he said.
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