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Terminal Illness

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NEWS
April 5, 2003
INSIDE/OUT You often hear that the only certainties in life are death and taxes. But if you're a Silva and male, another certainty is that you'll go bald at an early age. All of the men in my family possessed or possess the cue-ball gene -- my father, his father, my uncles, brothers and cousins all suffered the same, hairless fate. It's a fate we were destined at birth to meet and meet soon. No one escapes. It isn't an easy thing, to be bald in a society that worships youth and beauty.
FEATURES
March 28, 2009
The Journal of the American Medical Assn. recently published a study showing that terminally ill patients are far more likely to demand invasive treatments and endure prolonged suffering before death if religion plays a part in their decision-making. A number of doctors said patients who demand these procedures rack up sizable medical expenses, and furthermore, that the last-minute treatments do not improve their chances of survival. Some doctors went on to say that they wished they could better bridge the gap between religious faith and practical end-of-life care.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2007
Billed as a coming-of-age, slice-of-life dramedy, “The Spot,” Blackhole Theatre’s world premiere play at The Banshee in Burbank, is in dire need of playwriting and directing assistance. Author Danny LeGare, who also serves as the director, producer and lead actor, may be wearing too many hats. His 90-minute one-act is light on conflict. The result is a show full of uninteresting characters sitting around talking about things that never engage the audience. You see, it’s just another day at The Spot, a neighborhood watering hole, owned and operated by four generations of the Carver family.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2006
The subjects of life, death and love are (literally) tripping through writer-director Darren Aronofsky's mind in his latest film, "The Fountain." Set, more or less, in three different eras ? Spain during the Inquisition, present-day New York City, and sometime in the future ? Aronofsky's tale is an ambitious one amid so much of today's safety-first movie-making. That Aronofsky comes up short of his wild ambitions is not the story of a movie gone bad, but one with elements of wild-eyed interest and too much of the just plain ordinary.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2006
Last HolidaySo, Hollywood has decided to remake an Alec Guinness movie from the 1950s in which the diagnosis of a terminal illness inspires someone with a pretty unremarkable life to really live it up in the short time they have left. And it was a great idea to put Queen Latifah in it! There is something so genuine about her -- she really comes across as someone with a good heart who deserves every last bit of over-the-top fun she can dream up. And as she transforms herself (Cinderella-style)
NEWS
April 5, 2000
Good policing requires good judgment Question: How many police officers does it take to write two little boys tickets? Apparently, two. On March 22, I witnessed two officers writing tickets to two little boys (about 10 or 12 years old) who were on bicycles at the corner of Pass and Olive avenues. I understand the economics involved here; no taxpayer wants to pay for a bloated police force. But if you can't justify salaries, maybe you should consider some layoffs.
FEATURES
May 19, 2007
T he Rev. Will Bowen of the Assn. of Unity Churches wants everybody to stop complaining. Complaining, he says, only leads to more things to complain about. And if the world's population could collectively stop harping, we'd be a better place. Bowen has reportedly challenged his Missouri congregation to wear purple bracelets to remind themselves to stop complaining, criticizing or gossiping. He also challenged them to stop complaining for 21 days to break habits.
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FEATURES
March 28, 2009
The Journal of the American Medical Assn. recently published a study showing that terminally ill patients are far more likely to demand invasive treatments and endure prolonged suffering before death if religion plays a part in their decision-making. A number of doctors said patients who demand these procedures rack up sizable medical expenses, and furthermore, that the last-minute treatments do not improve their chances of survival. Some doctors went on to say that they wished they could better bridge the gap between religious faith and practical end-of-life care.
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NEWS
April 5, 2003
INSIDE/OUT You often hear that the only certainties in life are death and taxes. But if you're a Silva and male, another certainty is that you'll go bald at an early age. All of the men in my family possessed or possess the cue-ball gene -- my father, his father, my uncles, brothers and cousins all suffered the same, hairless fate. It's a fate we were destined at birth to meet and meet soon. No one escapes. It isn't an easy thing, to be bald in a society that worships youth and beauty.
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