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NEWS
August 30, 2013
Re: “ Scavenging from trash is illegal ,” Mailbag, Aug.21. Have Burbank residents become so cruel that they would actually report someone who is trying to make a few dollars by digging into trash bins to extract recyclables? I don't think it's right to tattle on scavengers; I figure if they're doing it, they probably have to. It must be hard work culling through trash bins. Demeaning too, but for some it might be their only income. They have my permission to take whatever they can use from my blue recycling bin. I pay the monthly refuse bill so it should be my say, not the city's.
NEWS
August 20, 2013
In Saturday's mailbag, a misinformed contributor claimed that scavenging is not considered theft . She cited a 21-year-old incident in Hancock Park as proof that removing recyclables is permissible. I contacted John Molnar, Burbank's Public Works director, for clarification. Molnar confirmed that it is indeed illegal to scavenge any material from solid waste containers in the city of Burbank . He further remarked that it is considered theft, in accordance with Burbank's Municipal Code, BMC4-2-111.7, and any violation should be reported to the police department for enforcement.
NEWS
August 8, 2001
Karen S. Kim HILLSIDE DISTRICT -- More than 40 community members and city officials donned their shades and comfortable shoes Aug. 2 to celebrate Burbank's newest resource: trash. The city hosted a dedication ceremony for its new set of 10 microturbines -- energy generators that are the size of refrigerators -- that began converting trash to energy at Burbank's landfill two weeks ago. Mayor Bob Kramer, Councilman David Laurell, Councilwoman Marsha Ramos and city officials met at the landfill, 2500 Bel Aire Drive, Thursday afternoon to tour the site of the new turbines.
THE818NOW
August 27, 2012
A 51-year-old Burbank man was cited and released Saturday after he asked a woman who was taking out her trash for sexual favors, police said. Michael Mayo was cited on suspicion of soliciting lewd acts - a misdemeanor - at about 3:23 p.m. in the 1200 block of Riverside Drive after she notified police about the incident and officers found him in a parking lot, according to Burbank Police Sgt. Darin Ryburn. The 28-year-old Burbank woman was taking out the trash outside her apartment when Mayo allegedly yelled repeatedly to get her attention before asking for sexual favors, according Ryburn.
NEWS
April 21, 2001
Karen S. Kim HILLSIDE DISTRICT -- The old shoes, coffee grounds, orange peels and tattered clothes Burbank residents toss in the trash could be used to power their televisions, refrigerators, air conditioners and swimming pool heaters this summer. Eight microturbine units -- energy generators -- will be installed at Burbank's landfill by June to convert methane gas, the natural byproduct released when trash decomposes, into a renewable form of energy, the City Council decided Tuesday.
NEWS
August 10, 2002
Molly Shore When park patrons want to stash their trash, they look for the Profiler. In the past year, Burbank's recycling center has installed 26 of the large, white Profilers -- so named because their profiles are easily recognizable -- in parks around town. The bins have three openings -- two on each side with a blue labels for aluminum cans and both glass and plastic bottles, and a yellow opening for newspapers. Before the Profilers were placed in parks, plastic bins were used on a trial basis in clusters with one for trash and two for recycling, city recycling coordinator Al Zorn said.
NEWS
By Jason Wells | November 12, 2008
BURBANK ? Passengers and crew aboard the 9:30 a.m. Southwest flight came upon an unusual sight Tuesday as they landed at Bob Hope Airport: dozens of people in bright yellow T-shirts walking down the middle of Runway 826. They were searching for ?foreign object debris,? otherwise known as trash ? a potentially costly pest when sucked into jet engines. A plastic bag, screw, loose pebble or stick can cause hundreds of thousands of dollars? worth of damage to aircraft engines or tires.
NEWS
By Chris Wiebe | September 2, 2006
SOUTH SAN FERNANDO DISTRICT ? Every day, about 300 tons of waste is hauled down Flower Street to the city's recycling center, where massive heaps of refuse harbor a putrid paradise for warlike swarms of flies. Honey bees hover over a trash bin overflowed with aluminum cans, extracting the sugar and water reminisces from hundreds of consumed soft drinks. "This is the new urban meadow ? the cans are like sparkling flowers filled with artificial nectar," recycling coordinator Kreigh Hampel said.
NEWS
By: ANNIE P. HOVANESSIAN | September 17, 2005
The Burbank Jaycees is headed to Playa del Rey to participate in the 21st annual California Coastal Cleanup Day from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. today. Cited by the Guinness Book of World Records as "the largest garbage collection" in 1993, more than 50,000 volunteers will congregate to more than 700 cleanup sites to pick up items dumped on beaches. This is the second year the Burbank Jaycees will participate. "As Jaycees, we are committed to helping the communities we serve and are proud to be part of such a wide scale event," said Jaycee and event organizer Dominic Izon.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kelly Corrigan, kelly.corrigan@latimes.com | April 1, 2014
David Starr Jordan Middle School is one of three middle schools that are finalists in a countywide competition to reduce the amount of trash schools send to landfills. Months ago, Jordan students began participating in a competition overseen by Grades of Green, an environmental nonprofit that works with the sanitation districts in Los Angeles County to promote environmental education. Over time, students already involved in a club on Jordan's campus known to pick up trash after lunch began educating other students by informing them in classroom presentations about which bins on campus should be used for recyclables, trash or compost items such as orange peels or salad.
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NEWS
August 30, 2013
Re: “ Scavenging from trash is illegal ,” Mailbag, Aug.21. Have Burbank residents become so cruel that they would actually report someone who is trying to make a few dollars by digging into trash bins to extract recyclables? I don't think it's right to tattle on scavengers; I figure if they're doing it, they probably have to. It must be hard work culling through trash bins. Demeaning too, but for some it might be their only income. They have my permission to take whatever they can use from my blue recycling bin. I pay the monthly refuse bill so it should be my say, not the city's.
NEWS
August 20, 2013
In Saturday's mailbag, a misinformed contributor claimed that scavenging is not considered theft . She cited a 21-year-old incident in Hancock Park as proof that removing recyclables is permissible. I contacted John Molnar, Burbank's Public Works director, for clarification. Molnar confirmed that it is indeed illegal to scavenge any material from solid waste containers in the city of Burbank . He further remarked that it is considered theft, in accordance with Burbank's Municipal Code, BMC4-2-111.7, and any violation should be reported to the police department for enforcement.
NEWS
August 16, 2013
Mailbag contributor Steve Urbanovich grumbles about individuals taking recyclables out of refuse bins on his block, believing what these people are doing is theft (“ Put an end to recycling theft ,” Aug. 7). Sorry, Mr. Urbanovich, but it's not theft; trash in bins on the street is considered abandoned property and even though the city wants the money, it does not have exclusive rights to the recycled material. In 1992 Los Angeles Times columnist Patt Morrison wrote about this subject when she interviewed a well-heeled resident of Hancock Park who groused about her money being pilfered by scavengers on trash pick-up day. It prompted me to write a letter in response where I advised the complainer that if she wanted to see her money being pilfered, she should visit City Hall where she could see her money pilfered every day. My original suggestion still stands.
THE818NOW
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene.tchekmedyian@latimes.com | May 28, 2013
Burbank officials have decided to gradually wind down subsidies for trash-hauling and sewer bills for low-income seniors and disabled people after voters in April rejected a measure to keep funding the program. The City Council last week decided to pitch in $292,490 to phase out the program over the next three years, tapping one-time money from the city's General Fund, which pays for most public services, as they starting weaning the 1,900 customers off the subsidies. Qualifying customers will still see their bills jump in July since the city isn't funding the whole program, which costs $390,000 a year.
NEWS
November 21, 2012
As I left home last Thursday morning to walk my dog, the trash man, a kind-looking gentleman, pulled up and emptied my black trash can. With a smile and a nod he continued down my street. As my dog and I briskly walked in the same direction as the trash truck, I noticed that a neighbor's trash can appeared to be stuck in the apparatus of the truck as it was idling at the curb. As we passed the truck, exchanging smiles again, I realized that he was waiting for my dog and me to pass before lowering the large can to the street.
NEWS
October 31, 2012
I believe people who leave their trash cans out the day after pickup, and that day is sweeper day, should be ticketed the same as a car being there. Each residence on either side of the perpetrator does not get the advantage of having the street swept in front of their house. It's the same people every week. Steve Urbanovich Burbank
NEWS
By Alene Tchekmedyian, alene@tchekmedyian@latimes.com | October 2, 2012
Burbank residents in April will be asked to approve a special tax on their trash and sewer service bills that would subsidize the fees for low-income seniors over the age of 62, disabled people and those who require life support in their homes. Burbank residents have actually been supporting this program - which costs each customer about $10 to $15 a year - for more than 20 years. But recent court rulings related to Proposition 218, which states that property-related service fees can't exceed the cost of the service, suggest the city faces legal risks if it continues to offer the programs under the current structure.
THE818NOW
August 27, 2012
A 51-year-old Burbank man was cited and released Saturday after he asked a woman who was taking out her trash for sexual favors, police said. Michael Mayo was cited on suspicion of soliciting lewd acts - a misdemeanor - at about 3:23 p.m. in the 1200 block of Riverside Drive after she notified police about the incident and officers found him in a parking lot, according to Burbank Police Sgt. Darin Ryburn. The 28-year-old Burbank woman was taking out the trash outside her apartment when Mayo allegedly yelled repeatedly to get her attention before asking for sexual favors, according Ryburn.
THE818NOW
December 30, 2011
As the holidays season nears an end, so does the need for a Christmas tree. The City of Burbank has a few options for those of you who want to recycle your tree. Residents can take old trees to the Verdugo Park Parking lot or McCambridge Park on the Andover Drive side. The city will then turn the tree mulch into compost. The city will also be picking up trees near regular curbside trash over the next couple of weeks. -- Ross A. Benson, for Times Community News Photo: Christmas tree recycling drop-off at McCambridge Park in Burbank.
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