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NEWS
October 14, 2011
Do we really need to spend $60 million on smart meters to tell us what most of us already know (Smart meters don't count as 'renewable,' Oct. 2)? Or do we need to spend that much money to inform people that it is better to use electric appliances in off-peak hours, such as in the evening or at night? The utility has been telling us that for years. Seems like a waste of money to me. Proponents contend that a smarter grid allows customers to take better advantage of renewable energy and thus take part in “a cleaner, more efficient and more reliable future.” What does that mean?
THE818NOW
March 5, 2013
Complaints about the massive open-air recycling facility in Sun Valley flow in each month in minute, sometimes stomach-turning detail. Rats have skittered off the property of Community Recycling & Resource Recovery and into a nearby business, according to calls logged by the city. Churning dust is said to be "making everyone's eyes burn," making breathing difficult and causing bloody noses among workers at a neighborhood paving firm. Gulls scavenging from piles of food waste have scattered bits of garbage from the sky. And then there is the stench, variously described in the logs as "a dead animal smell," a "rotten egg odor" and "putrid.
NEWS
April 13, 2002
Laura Sturza BURBANK -- Burbank is one of 17 Los Angeles County cities to have met the state's requirements for diverting waste from landfills, according to a California Environmental Protection Agency study. Starting in 1989, cities were required by the state to reduce the amount of waste sent to landfills by 50%. For 2000, Burbank reduced its landfill waste by 63% by recycling 40 tons per day of metals, glass, paper and other materials. The Burbank Recycling Center also processes 75 tons per day of green waste that is used for composting.
NEWS
August 26, 2006
ON THE AGENDA The council will consider the following items at Tuesday's meeting. PROJECT LIGHTSPEED The council will listen to an update from the city manager's office regarding negotiations between the city and AT&T about "Project Lightspeed," a project that will allow AT&T to install broadband cables beneath city streets. The fiber optic line would be capable of transmitting data, audio and video media at incredibly fast speeds. WHAT TO EXPECT As it stands, the agreement provides for AT&T to reimburse the city for permitting an installation of the broadband infrastructure.
NEWS
January 26, 2008
Alternative fuel worth the time and energy I think plans to construct an alternative-fueling station in Burbank would be wonderful (?Council looks to alternative fueling,? Jan. 19). I drive a Mercedes-Benz diesel that runs on straight vegetable oil (the cleanest car on the road at this moment). If Councilwoman Anja Reinke thinks ?it?s a waste of time at this point,? she?s not well informed. There are hundreds of recycled Mercedes diesels in Los Angeles that have been converted to run on straight vegetable oil, waste vegetable oil or bio diesel.
NEWS
July 28, 2001
Gary Moskowitz HILLSIDE DISTRICT -- Norman Millar is not a surgeon, but his latest building project at times has felt like delicate surgery. When he started thinking about an old gym on the campus of Burbank's Woodbury University sitting relatively unused, Millar got an idea. His idea was to take the two-story, 21,000-square-foot structure built in 1952 and convert it into what some of his architecture department colleagues have referred to as a "giant lung" -- a building that uses modern sky lights to provide natural light and ventilation.
NEWS
July 29, 2000
Privatization backer short on facts The privatization advocate spewed a mishmash of terms, unsubstantiated claims and polemics and ended up urging Burbank officials to consider the option of privatization ("Privatization could end refuse rate hikes," July 12) First off, he never makes it clear whether he means all solid-waste operations or just landfills. Second, what makes him think City officials have not given serious consideration to privatization?
NEWS
May 17, 2000
Will Rogers One hits 40 and starts finding reasons to repeat over and over the cliche, "Youth is wasted on the young." A lot of people seem to think there's a tad too much of that waste going on among the front-line staff of Congressman Jim Rogan. OK, they're not THAT young, but it's a perception of many who've dealt with them. Both in energy and attitude, they leave many feeling old. Local party players and journalists from throughout the country who touch base with me as they drop by to cover the nation's hottest contest are among the elderly (those over 30)
ARTICLES BY DATE
THE818NOW
September 13, 2013
Residents with hazardous and electronic waste at home that's too toxic to throw away in the trash can properly dispose of it at a city event on Saturday, officials said. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., city officials will be collecting hazardous waste, free of charge, at the Burbank Fire Training Center, located at 1845 Ontario St. Residents are encouraged to bring products that are labeled: toxic, poison, combustible, corrosive, flammable or irritant. That may include bug spray, certain garden and paint products, automotive fluids and batteries, certain beauty products and household cleaners.
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NEWS
March 22, 2013
I'm curious why the city of Burbank encourages water conservation for its homeowners, even asking them to landscape with native drought-resistant plants, when on Bel Aire Drive and Magnolia Boulevard, an out-of-service fire hydrant has been spewing water into the sewer system at the rate of 5 gallons per second for the last four days. Do the math and see how much water is being wasted. I figured more than a million gallons. With the rate increases of water usage and continual reminders to conserve water on your water bill, why is the city of Burbank wasting this water?
THE818NOW
March 5, 2013
Complaints about the massive open-air recycling facility in Sun Valley flow in each month in minute, sometimes stomach-turning detail. Rats have skittered off the property of Community Recycling & Resource Recovery and into a nearby business, according to calls logged by the city. Churning dust is said to be "making everyone's eyes burn," making breathing difficult and causing bloody noses among workers at a neighborhood paving firm. Gulls scavenging from piles of food waste have scattered bits of garbage from the sky. And then there is the stench, variously described in the logs as "a dead animal smell," a "rotten egg odor" and "putrid.
COMMUNITY
By Joyce Rudolph | February 26, 2013
Temple Beth Emet helped the community recycle responsibly by offering an E-waste Collection Event on Feb. 17 in the temple parking lot. Members of the temple and the public dropped off TVs, VCRs, computers, monitors, stereos, copiers and fax machines. It's a way to protect the environment, said Molly Blumberg, ways and means chairwoman. About a half-ton was collected, said Logan Smith, who is also a temple member. Burbank resident Ursula Arndt dropped off a DVD player, router, modem and outdated cable connection equipment.
THE818NOW
January 17, 2012
Luther Burbank Middle School hosted an e-waste recycling event Saturday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The school's Imagine Green Eco Club collected unused or broken TVs, remote controls, laptops, monitors and cell phones, among other electronic devices. The electronics will be recycled by eWaste Center Inc., of Commerce.   -- Maria Hsin , Times Community News Twitter: @mariahsin    
NEWS
October 14, 2011
Do we really need to spend $60 million on smart meters to tell us what most of us already know (Smart meters don't count as 'renewable,' Oct. 2)? Or do we need to spend that much money to inform people that it is better to use electric appliances in off-peak hours, such as in the evening or at night? The utility has been telling us that for years. Seems like a waste of money to me. Proponents contend that a smarter grid allows customers to take better advantage of renewable energy and thus take part in “a cleaner, more efficient and more reliable future.” What does that mean?
NEWS
By Veronica Rocha, veronica.rocha@latimes.com | July 26, 2011
Approximately 30 tons of old and used electronics were dropped off at an “e-waste” collection event Saturday. F&H Office Systems and Unity Church hosted the free electronic waste collection drive from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the church parking lot on Victory Drive, where residents brought in rundown printers, computer monitors, home entertainment equipment and cell phones for recycling, organizers said. “I believe every day is an Earth day,” F&H owner Joseph Fischer said.
NEWS
By Gretchen Meier, gretchen.meier@latimes.com | August 18, 2010
More than 1,000 Los Angeles County households on Saturday dropped off a combined 80,000 pounds of electronic and hazardous waste, including computer monitors, motor oil and buckets of paint, at the Burbank Fire Department Training Center, officials said. From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., county Department of Public Works employees gathered 20,000 pounds of electronic — also known as "e-waste" — 60,000 pounds of hazardous waste, keeping liquids out of household trash cans that residents dispose of every day. "When it comes to protecting the environment, individual actions make a big difference," county public works Director Gail Farber said in a statement.
NEWS
August 14, 2010
From 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday at the Burbank Fire Department Training Center, residents can drop off their household hazardous and electronic waste. The event is presented by the Department of Public Works and the Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County in cooperation with the cities of Burbank, Glendale, Los Angeles and San Fernando. No business waste, explosives, ammunition, radioactive materials, trash, refrigerators, stoves, washing machines or controlled substances will be accepted, officials announced.
FEATURES
April 17, 2010
For all of my life, America has been the wealthiest and most stable nation in the world. Our economic leadership has allowed us to spend more on our universities and our military, our hospitals and our space program. Other nations stockpile reserves of dollars in order to back up their own currencies, strengthening the dollar, while our economic power allows us to borrow money inexpensively and invest in the remarkable creativity of our people. Unfortunately, our central role in the world economy is not guaranteed, and our economy is the weakest it has been in a generation.
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