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NEWS
By Jeremy Oberstein | February 11, 2008
BURBANK — The three-month-long Writers Guild of America strike that crippled Hollywood and resulted in lost wages totaling more than $2 billion is slowly drawing to a close. Writers guild leaders unanimously supported a tentative three-year contract that calls for increased DVD residuals and a larger share of profits for projects streamed on the Internet, two of the main reasons writers stopped work on Nov. 5, guild spokesman Gregg Mitchell said. The agreement would double the rate that writers are paid for movie and television shows sold online, establish the union’s jurisdiction over programming created for the Internet and provide payment for entertainment that is streamed on websites, according to the terms of the agreement released by the guild.
NEWS
December 6, 2003
Robert Chacon Handy Market has been a Magnolia Avenue staple for 33 years. Although independent markets like his continue to disappear, owner Alan Arzoian said his store is experiencing a shot in the arm because of the ongoing supermarket strike. The work stoppage has given his store a chance to win over large-chain shoppers, Arzoian said. "The first week of the strike was really wild," he said this week. "We saw an increase of 50% to 60% in daily volume.
BUSINESS
By Jeremy Oberstein | February 16, 2008
BURBANK — As the city continues to calculate the economic fallout from 100 days of out-of-work writers, studios quickly began getting back to work as prime-time television shows prepare to return. On Tuesday, 92.5% of Writers Guild of America members voted to end the strike. A decision to ratify the terms of the agreement, which doubles the amount television and movie writers are paid for projects streamed online and gives the union jurisdiction over programming created for the Internet, is expected by the end of February, guild spokesman Gregg Mitchell said.
NEWS
August 21, 2002
Here we go again, as baseball readies for its ninth work stoppage in 30 years. Fans shouldn't be surprised at the fact that the sport's players have set a strike date of Aug. 30. In fact, they should be used to it. Just like Leap Year and the New York Yankees winning the World Series, a strike should be seen as something that comes along every few years. And although fans might be upset and angry if the Major League Baseball Players' Assn.
BUSINESS
By Jeremy Oberstein | December 22, 2007
BURBANK — A new report from the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. paints an unsettling picture of the financial fallout from the writers’ strike in which millions of dollars in wages have been lost during the nearly seven-week work stoppage. “Based on data we got, there is $342 million lost in [Writers Guild of America] wages,” said Jack Kyser, the head of the economic group. “The entertainment industry is losing $135 million a week.” The lost wages are well ahead of the pace set in 1988, when the previous writers’ strike in Hollywood lasted 22 weeks, Kyser said.
NEWS
By Jeremy Oberstein | December 22, 2007
BURBANK ? A new report from the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. paints an unsettling picture of the financial fallout from the writers? strike in which millions of dollars in wages have been lost during the nearly seven-week work stoppage. ?Based on data we got, there is $342 million lost in [Writers Guild of America] wages,? said Jack Kyser, the head of the economic group. ?The entertainment industry is losing $135 million a week.? The lost wages are well ahead of the pace set in 1988, when the previous writers?
BUSINESS
By Jeremy Oberstein | April 18, 2008
BURBANK — Hoping to secure a deal that would keep thousands of acting jobs in place, two of Hollywood’s major labor unions met this week in an attempt to stave off another strike that could, once again, cripple the local economy. The Screen Actors Guild, which represents nearly 120,000 actors, and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers met Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday trying to agree on terms for a new contract that is set to expire June 30. Both have been quiet on the status of their negotiations, held at the producers’ base in Sherman Oaks, each issuing one-sentence joint releases, leaving observers mixed about the possibility of a potential work stoppage.
BUSINESS
By Jeremy Oberstein | November 5, 2007
BURBANK — Jim Cooper is like many of the thousands of writers who began their strike Monday at 14 Los Angeles area studios: The father of 5-year-old triplets did not want to strike but felt there was no other option. “Yeah, it will affect us, but we had to do this,” said Cooper, a Disney screenwriter. Cooper was joined by dozens of other Writers Guild of America members Monday at the Walt Disney Studios on Riverside Drive, wearing red shirts and waving signs.
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NEWS
By Alison Tully | July 2, 2008
BURBANK ? The Screen Actors Guild agreement expired at midnight Monday without any new deal being reached, meaning that the movie and television industry is now in a de facto strike. ?Film production is virtually shut down, and television production is now seriously threatened,? said Jesse Hiestand, spokesman for the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers. With no renewed contract signed, the old terms affect guild members still working, Hiestand said. In an effort to finish negotiations, the alliance released a final offer to guild members on Monday that provides more than $250 million in additional compensation, he said.
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BUSINESS
By Jeremy Oberstein | April 19, 2008
BURBANK — Hoping to secure a deal that would keep thousands of acting jobs in place, two of Hollywood’s major labor unions met this week in an attempt to stave off another strike that could, once again, cripple the local economy. The Screen Actors Guild, which represents nearly 120,000 actors, and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers met Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday trying to agree on terms for a new contract that is set to expire June 30. Both have been quiet on the status of their negotiations, held at the producers’ base in Sherman Oaks, each issuing one-sentence joint releases, leaving observers mixed about the possibility of a potential work stoppage.
BUSINESS
By Jeremy Oberstein | February 16, 2008
BURBANK — As the city continues to calculate the economic fallout from 100 days of out-of-work writers, studios quickly began getting back to work as prime-time television shows prepare to return. On Tuesday, 92.5% of Writers Guild of America members voted to end the strike. A decision to ratify the terms of the agreement, which doubles the amount television and movie writers are paid for projects streamed online and gives the union jurisdiction over programming created for the Internet, is expected by the end of February, guild spokesman Gregg Mitchell said.
NEWS
By Jeremy Oberstein | February 11, 2008
BURBANK — The three-month-long Writers Guild of America strike that crippled Hollywood and resulted in lost wages totaling more than $2 billion is slowly drawing to a close. Writers guild leaders unanimously supported a tentative three-year contract that calls for increased DVD residuals and a larger share of profits for projects streamed on the Internet, two of the main reasons writers stopped work on Nov. 5, guild spokesman Gregg Mitchell said. The agreement would double the rate that writers are paid for movie and television shows sold online, establish the union’s jurisdiction over programming created for the Internet and provide payment for entertainment that is streamed on websites, according to the terms of the agreement released by the guild.
BUSINESS
By Jeremy Oberstein | December 22, 2007
BURBANK — A new report from the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. paints an unsettling picture of the financial fallout from the writers’ strike in which millions of dollars in wages have been lost during the nearly seven-week work stoppage. “Based on data we got, there is $342 million lost in [Writers Guild of America] wages,” said Jack Kyser, the head of the economic group. “The entertainment industry is losing $135 million a week.” The lost wages are well ahead of the pace set in 1988, when the previous writers’ strike in Hollywood lasted 22 weeks, Kyser said.
NEWS
By Jeremy Oberstein | December 22, 2007
BURBANK ? A new report from the Los Angeles County Economic Development Corp. paints an unsettling picture of the financial fallout from the writers? strike in which millions of dollars in wages have been lost during the nearly seven-week work stoppage. ?Based on data we got, there is $342 million lost in [Writers Guild of America] wages,? said Jack Kyser, the head of the economic group. ?The entertainment industry is losing $135 million a week.? The lost wages are well ahead of the pace set in 1988, when the previous writers?
NEWS
By Jeremy Oberstein | December 8, 2007
BURBANK — As writers and producers returned to the negotiating table this week, fallout from the strike that began more than a month ago continued to claim jobs from those whose livelihoods are directly affected by the lack of studio production. The Writers Guild of America and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers inched closer to a resolution Tuesday when the writers welcomed a proposal from the producers that called for a $130-million increase over three years to the rate structure for new media shown on the Internet and cellphones.
BUSINESS
By Jeremy Oberstein | November 7, 2007
MEDIA DISTRICT — Jim Cooper is like many of the thousands of writers who began their strike Monday at 14 Los Angeles area studios: The father of 5-year-old triplets did not want to strike but felt there was no other option. “Yeah, it will affect us, but we had to do this,” said Cooper, a Disney screenwriter. Cooper was joined by dozens of other Writers Guild of America members Monday at the Walt Disney Studios on Riverside Drive, wearing red shirts and waving signs.
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